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$139.99 $129.95 list()
61. Nikon Eagleview 8-24x25 Zoom Binoculars
$499.00
62. NIKON FM3A 35mm SLR Camera Body
$224.88
63. NIKON FM10 35mm Camera Kit
$379.88
64. NIKON 60mm F/2.8 D-Series Micro
$129.94 $117.99 list()
65. Nikon 28-100mm f/3.5-5.6 Autofocus
$695.00
66. Nikon Coolpix 5000 5MP Digital
$189.94 $175.04 list()
67. Nikon N75 35mm SLR Camera (Body
Too low to display $149.00 list()
68. Nikon Action 12x50 EX Extreme
$199.94 list($299.99)
69. Nikon 440 ProStaff Laser Range
$579.88
70. NIKON 10.5MM f/2.8 G IF-ED Fisheye
71. Nikon Coolpix 2500 2MP Digital
$364.99 $329.99 list()
72. Nikon N80 35mm SLR Camera (Body
$529.99
73. AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor 24-120mm f/3.5-5.6G
$147.94 $118.99 list()
74. Nikon 10-22x50 Action Zoom XL
$299.99 $249.99 list()
75. Nikon N75 35mm SLR Camera Kit
$33.95
76. NIKON 62mm UV Haze Filter
$1,299.95
77. Nikon StabilEyes 12x32 Team Realtree
Too low to display $59.00 list()
78. Nikon One Touch 90s QD Zoom Date
$179.99 $164.95 list()
79. Nikon Action 10x50 EX Extreme
80. Nikon Lite Touch 130 ED/QD Zoom

61. Nikon Eagleview 8-24x25 Zoom Binoculars (Silver)

our price: $139.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0002Y5WV6
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Nikon
Sales Rank: 1630
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Features

  • Quick central focusing
  • Sharp multicoated optics for superb contrast and vivid color
  • New ergonomic body design
  • BaK4 high index prisms
  • Diopter adjustment for strain-free viewing

Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars BUY THESE!
I was absolutely astounded with the amazing clarity of these binocs. Tremendous zoom range, small enough to pack anywhere, and again, tremendous, stunning clarity. Buy these!

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent sharp views for sightseeing or other uses.
We bought these binoculars to use for our honeymoon cruise, and we were very pleased. In particular, we love the eyepieces that raise and lower for use with or without glasses (helpful for both eyeglasses and sunglasses users). Secondly, the width of the binoculars adjusts for the space between your eyes, allowing a custom view for each user. Also, the binoculars are small and lightweight, making them perfect for travel. Finally--and most importantly--the binoculars provide a clear, sharp picture that stays relatively stable even at higher magnifications. Highly recommended for the casual user.

5-0 out of 5 stars Just What I Wanted
I got this great pair of Nikon Eagleview 8-24x25 Zoom II Binoculars as a gift from my Mom & Dad for Christmas. I've had several other pairs, but never this compact and powerful. The zoom is VERY smooth and keeps good focus throughout. Nice and lightweight, they did well as 'opera glasses' on my visit to the symphony last week. And I'm getting a better close-up of my favorite birds. The 'field' is not as good as with dedicated wide-view optics, but you can't complain. Just What I Wanted ... Read more


62. NIKON FM3A 35mm SLR Camera Body (Lens not included)

(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00005LERK
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Nikon
Sales Rank: 4391
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Features

  • True TTL Classic 60/40 Center Weighted metering helps determine proper exposure
  • Manual or DX ISO Film settings
  • New Hybrid Shutter Control System
  • Uses Nikon and Nikon Mount Lenses - A lens is not included with this camera and must be purchased separately
  • TTL Flash Metering System -Super fast 1/4,000 second to 1 second plus Bulb

Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars Chrome and Black Leather
I just bought one of these used, but in great condition. What a joy to hold and use! Light, fast, responsive, but not a toy for ones who like "idiot proof" cameras. A peerless image making tool for those who know what they want and can still multiply & divide by 2.... I wear glasses, and the finder presents no problems. Standard PC connector for studio use, and cable release for time exposures. NO SHUTTER LAG! If you can see it and hit the button, the moment is captured on film for the ages. Add an MD12 motordrive, Vivitar 285 flash and you've got a set-up that will do anything. This rugged and substantial camera will go anywhere. Best of all, no batteries are needed for basic operation. Cons? I don't have two of them! Get a 50mm F1.8 lens with it and skip the cheap zoom. You'll see what photography was meant to be.

5-0 out of 5 stars Best new camera of its type
If you are looking for a camera without all the whizbang circuitry and computerizations that take the challenge out of setting up a camera, you have two choices. The first is to take your chances in the used market. The second choice is the Nikon FM3a.

The FM3a is a completely mechanical camera with only the most basic electronics built in. DX sensors make forgetting to reset the film settings a thing of the past. The Aperture Priority shutter setting allows the you to let the camera do the heavy work of deciding the shutter speed. And the center-weighted TTL metering makes an external light meter redundant.

Forget all those niceties. You are looking for a camera that will take you back to the beginning, back to a time when you enjoyed the fiddling and fondling of cameras. You don't want the automations, and with this camera, you don't need to think about them. The film ISO settings can be changed manually to allow pushing and pulling of film. The shutter speed can be set manually from 8 seconds down to 1/4000th of a second. And the focusing and aperture setting is ALL manual.

If you like having complete control over a camera, this is the one for you. It won't give you spot metering or auto-focus or 'portrait' mode and 'landscape' mode. But it will give you the tools to craft the photos you want, the way you want.

It's not a digital wonder. Thank heavens.

That said, there are a few things Nikon could have done better. They could have put in a mirror lockup to keep the camera steadier. They could have made the exposure compensation dial easier to use (get rid of that button, Nikon!). And they could have made the light meter easier to see in the dark. But these things are niggling inconsistencies at worst.

The camera works well and is excellent at what it does. The rest, as they say, is up to you.

5-0 out of 5 stars Back to the future...
Is everyone you know buying a digital camera? I have decided to go against the trend, and bought a FM3A. A light-weight and nearly manual camera. Why Nikon? After having used Canon for 20 years I decided to make the switch because I wanted better built quality. Something that lasts.

This baby has nearly all the pro features you are looking for in a camera. Built-in light meter, TTL flash, DX ISO, 1/4000 to 1 second, plus B. I usually choose the semi-automatic mode; by setting the aperture manually, then allowing the camera to set the shutter speed automatically.

As such, this camera is perfect for landscape photography. If you are like nature, and enjoy bush-walking or mountaineering, this Nikon is great. It only weighs 570g. This means that you can get away with using a light-weight tripod - if you don't mount big glass (a heavy telephoto lens). And it does not take much space. Good for travelling as well.

The only feature I sometimes miss is mirror lock-up. Without mirror lock-up, camera shake can cause problems at slower shutter speeds. But you can get around this issue by using the self-timer (causing the mirror to flip up before the shot is taken). A spot light-meter would have been nice, but you can still take spot readings by using a longer lens (or by zooming in).

The good thing about this film camera is that it provides me with the best of both worlds. I have the quality (and cheap price!) of film, the convenience of (slide) projection, but I can still scan the images into the computer if I need them digitally. And I can use the same set of lenses, should I decide to buy a digital body one day.

This is a simple to use semi-automatic camera - yet you can get find accessories for it (Nikon and third party) - including a motor-drive and flash.

Classic camera. I love it. Highly recommended. ... Read more


63. NIKON FM10 35mm Camera Kit

(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00006I5JN
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Nikon
Sales Rank: 940
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Features

  • In this kit, the FM10 body is fitted with Nikon's 35mm to 70mm lens
  • Full manual control
  • Selectable shutter speeds up to 1/2000th of 1 second
  • 'B' Setting
  • Depth of field Preview

Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars What is wrong with it? NOTHING!
I bought this camera brand new and I have to that it is a great camera. I needed a new 35mm fully manual but didn't feel like spending a fortune. I read the specs on the camera and bought it. It is one hell of a work horse. Anyone who bashes this camera has not used it.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Newest Incarnation of Nikon's Veritable Classic.
The FM series of cameras from Nikon has a long and distinguished history. The FM10 is a totally manual camera with through the lens center weighted metering. The beauty of the manual system is that you have a complete range of shutter speeds if the batteries fail. Additionally, you get to set the camera settings how you want to without trying to out think and out smart the auto programming that most cameras have now. In other words, you get to take the picture; not the camera. The FM10 is a sturdy camera that has one of the widest ranges of lenses available to it. There is not a lens that you can think of that can not be found for this camera. Beginners or professionals: anyone that wants to be a photographer and not just a button pusher should get this camera.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Little Camera that Could
Most of the reviews I've read about this camera say it's cheap, not up to Nikon's standards, and made out of horrible plastic.

They're very wrong. The camera's lighter than most manual cameras I've held, but it feels very sturdy. The lens it comes with is just fine for students and beginners, and I'll hold on to it even though I plan on getting a fixed 50mm Nikon lens very soon. Still, for the price, you can't beat it!

If you've read other reviews about how cheap this camera feels and you're weary, all I can say is go to a camera store and hold it. If you want something much more rugged you'll pay a lot more money. If you want something to start shooting with then get this camera. It'll also help you start building a good Nikon kit so if you decide to upgrade bodies later you won't have to repurchase all your lenses.

Great clarity, great quality ... Read more


64. NIKON 60mm F/2.8 D-Series Micro

(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00005LE77
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Nikon
Sales Rank: 4215
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Features

  • 60mm
  • F/2.8
  • D-Type lens
  • Uses 62mm filiter

65. Nikon 28-100mm f/3.5-5.6 Autofocus Nikkor Lens

our price: $129.94
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B000075AEU
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Nikon
Sales Rank: 3539
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Features

  • Rounded 7-blade aperture diaphragm
  • One aspherical lens element
  • G technology lets the user control aperture selection through the camera body
  • Filter Size -62mm
  • F-Stop Range -3.5-5.6 to 22

66. Nikon Coolpix 5000 5MP Digital Camera with 3x Optical Zoom

(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00005QJCU
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Nikon
Sales Rank: 3125
Average Customer Review: 3.64 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com Product Description

Once again, Nikon has upped the ante in the world of digital cameras with the introduction of the Coolpix 5000. Its 5-megapixel sensor, 28-85mm zoom lens, and extensive controls make this a great choice for discriminating photographers seeking a digital camera with filmlike quality and SLR-style manual controls.

In a departure from previous flagship Coolpix models, the 5000 is very compact (much smaller than the older 900-series models) and looks more or less like a traditional point-and-shoot. It does not employ the trademark Coolpix swiveling-lens design; instead, on this model, it's the LCD display that does the swiveling. The screen can be flipped out from the camera body and rotated for easy viewing from any shooting angle--it even works for a self-portrait. An added bonus to this design is the ability to tuck the vulnerable display inward for protection when the camera is not in use. Of course, images can also be composed by looking through the traditional optical viewfinder.

The Coolpix 5000 features a 3x zoom lens--the most common power for zoom digital cameras. It's the range that sets the Coolpix apart--its widest setting is an unusually wide 28mm, perfectly matching the wide-angle setting on most SLR cameras. Almost every other digital camera's wide-angle starts at 35 or 38mm. The all-glass lens features nine elements in seven groups.

Power is provided by a proprietary lithium-ion EN-EL1 battery rated for approximately 100 minutes of use (battery and charger are included). If you're worried about getting caught in the middle of nowhere with a dead battery, the camera also uses a standard disposable lithium 2CR5 camera battery. Unused lithium batteries hold their power for years, so you'll probably want to toss one of these into your camera bag as a backup. For hardcore photographers, there's also an optional power pack/hand grip that uses six AA batteries and offers several times the power capacity of the rechargeable pack.

We've come to expect Coolpix cameras to offer an extensive set of manual controls, and the 5000 offers sports than we can list here, including shutter speeds from 1/4,000 to 8 seconds, shutter priority, aperture priority, and full manual modes, manual focus and white balance, ISO ratings from 100 to 800, and numerous other settings to let photographers capture any shot they can dream up. See our product specs for more details.

An extensive selection of accessories has helped to make Coolpix cameras favorites with serious photographers. From wide angle and telephoto add-on lenses to an adapter that lets you use the camera as a scanner for your slides and negatives, Nikon offers enough add-ons to create a system that meets all of your needs.

Shutter lag--the delay between the time you press the button and the moment the camera actually captures the photo--is a problem with most digital cameras, and the Coolpix 5000 is no exception. The camera can take over a second to snap your picture after pressing the button, which can be an unacceptably long time, especially if you're trying to take a picture of a quick-moving subject. Most of this delay can be eliminated by prefocusing--composing your shot, then pressing the shutter button halfway down to allow the camera to adjust the focus and metering. When you're ready to take the picture, press the button the rest of the way down, and the shutter will snap almost instantly.

Movie mode captures movie clips with audio at resolutions of 320 x 240 pixels at approximately 15 frames per second for up to 40 seconds. This feature won't replace your camcorder, but it's perfect for when you just want to capture a quick movie and e-mail it to a friend or relative.

The Coolpix 5000 comes with a rechargeable EN-EL1 battery and charger, a 32 MB CompactFlash card, video and USB cables, lens cap, neck strap, and an impressive software suite that includes Genuine Fractals LE. The camera is covered by a one-year warranty.

... Read more

Features

  • 5.2 megapixel sensor creates 2,560 x 1,920 images for prints at 11 x 14 and beyond
  • 3x optical (plus 4x digital) zoom lens with autofocus
  • Included 32 MB CompactFlash card holds approximately 18 images at default resolution; camera is Microdrive compatible
  • Uses proprietary lithium-ion rechargeable battery (included)
  • Connects with Macs and PCs via USB port

Reviews (59)

4-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful. Worth the investment in time (& money).
I have been using the Coolpix 5000 for the past few weeks, just enough time to shoot 1,000+ photos. My 3rd Nikon and 1st digital, it's lived up to my expectations: I've been more than pleased with the quality of the images, my ultimate criterion. While you'll hear a lot of wasted drivel on feature A,B,C and comparisons with model X,Y,Z, you need to decide what you're trying to achieve before investing this much on a new gadget. If you want to capture quality digital images for selected printing in 8x10 sizes or larger - and are willing to invest the time in learning how to make that happen - then this could be the camera for you.

This is no simple point-and-shoot, which explains why some users have been apprehensive. Personally, I prefer the multitude of options it offers, including these (all of which I have used so far):
- Ability to manually override nearly every automatic setting, including: exposure mode (S,A,P,M), focus distance, AF focus areas (5), flash level compensation, sharpening, white-balance, etc.
- ISO sensitivity from 100 to 800, manual or auto, enabling hand-held shooting indoors
- Spot, center-weighted, and matrix (256 segment) metering
- Hot shoe to connect external flash for more lighting options
- Wide angle lens (28mm equivalent) is wider than most 'standard' lenses on similar cameras
- 3 User Set configurations let you adjust quickly to different shooting situations/styles
- Shutter speeds short (up to 1/2000s) or long (8 sec)

If you do like novel features, then don't worry, you'll also get red-eye reduction, self-timer, movie mode (QuickTime up to 60sec @ 15fps, 320x240) and "best shot selector". Rumor has it BSS is a cool feature that rattles off 3 frames and stores only the 'best' - the one with the most information, i.e., sharpest & best exposed (but I haven't used it). I did like discovering after I played back the first movie that the camera even has a built-in speaker for audio during playback. I also like the ability to zoom into images up to 6.0x during viewing to examine carefully whether you captured what you wanted. The buttons and menu settings, while overwhelming at first, really are intuitively designed - once you've figured out a feature, you don't have to keep returning to the manual.

I've been really pleased with the images I've captured so far. Fleshtones are realistic, sharpness of images is pleasing (not excessively sharp, or 'digital'), and metering is accurate. There's plenty of data to work with in the 5 megapixel images, which I shoot in FINE .jpg mode yielding a 1.5-2.0 MB image at 2560x1920 pixels. The lens glass on the CP5000 is the largest of the Coolpix's so far, which probably explains the higher image quality.

The typical 'knocks' on the CP5000, and my opinion:
-"85mm is too short!": so is 200mm. If you want to shoot models on South Beach, get an SLR and a 400mm lens instead.
-"32mb CF card is too small!": if you rely on only one CF card, you shouldn't be spending this much on a digital camera.
-"images are soft!": I prefer mine stirred, not sharpened, and do the rest in Photoshop. If you let the camera over-do it for you, there's no getting back the lost/interpolated data.
-"battery life's too short!": you'll run out of card space first (I use 128mb CF). You just spent a grand - stop whining and buy a 2nd battery.

So, what are its real "issues"?
- No way to screw in a UV/protection filter. For some reason, Nikon opted not to put threads over the glass. You have to buy the lens attachment mount (UR-E5) and attach filters to it. An inconvenience, since you can't replace the lens and really should protect it with a clear filter.
-It's slow to autofocus, especially in low-light situations, as there is no AF-assist illumination. I generally use manual focus or set the Single AF mode in such situations, and it seems to work just fine.
-My indoor pictures using the built-in flash sometimes over-saturate the reds in fleshtones. I suspect this is because the bulb is a bit blue/green, and the white-balance logic on the camera over-compensates. I have kept the WB setting on "Auto", but I may fiddle with this a bit to see if another manual setting produces better results. When this has happened, I just tweaked the Saturation of Reds in Photoshop and they look fine.
- It feels smaller than it looks in the promo photograph. If you have big hands, you need to break the habit of groping the camera with your right hand. Otherwise, you'll cover the flash sensor and over- or under-expose your flash shots.

Should you buy one? Qualified YES! It's not for everyone. You can pull it out of the box and start 'snapping photos', but you might end up with snapshots that you could have made with a cheaper alternative. If you give it a little time and really learn how - and when - to use its many features, then I think you will produce even better images than you'd imagined.

You'll really like the CP5000 if:
-you like the convenience of Auto-Everything features, but want the creativity that only comes with Manual settings;
-you like the idea of plugging your CF memory card into an Epson/HP photo printer and spitting out snapshots, but you'd prefer to 'tweak' them yourself in an image editor like Photoshop.
-you can't afford a digital SLR right now, but you can't wait to start experimenting with digital photography

I like it, and I think you will, too. Make an informed decision, and be sure that whatever you buy is the right tool for the job.

4-0 out of 5 stars Very good camera for natural light photography
I bought my CoolPix 5000 late December 2001 and have been shooting with it in various locations since then. I am globally pleased with the camera, but found its enveloppe of usage to be somewhat narrower than I was expecting.

As a foreword, I should say that, this being my first digital camera, as well as my first compact camera, I don't have any other obvious reference to compare it to.

First, the good points:

- very good images at 100 ISO,
- small size makes it very easy to carry the camera with you at any time. The 5000 is a compact camera, this should be kept in mind,
- very high feeling of quality when handling the beast,
- very convenient orientable screen,
- great zoom going down to 28 mm equivalent. Image sharpness appears to be very good at all focal lenght and appertures (without any scientific data though),
- good image results in point and shoot mode,
- very convenient tools for image review after shooting (including zoom to the pixel that makes it easy to assess the sharpness of the image).

Downsides:

- price,
- poor flash results (power and exposure),
- poor autofocus when selecting by hand which sensor you want to use. Most of the time, the camera is unable to find focus even on contrasty subjects. I gave up using this quickly. The automatic mode, in which the camera chooses automatically a sensor on which it could achieve focus, works fine for most cases (on point and shoot mode I mean),
- a lot of noise when using 200, 400 and 800 ISO modes (this could be the same with other digital cameras). I would strongly advise not to use these unless you really have to. They might allow you to take a sharp picture, but the result will mostly be unusable unless treated with special filters in photoshop (it seems some guys have created special actions that are good at removing such noise),
- slow electric zoom (but this is a normal feature for a compact camera),
- very short battery life. Any serious outing has to be planned with at least one if not 2 spare batteries,
- camera difficult to master (even with a strong Nikon background ranging from F-301 to F100, but the manual in Japanese did probably not help :-)).

To summarize, I believe that Nikon just released the best compact digital camera for day light photography ever made.

The problem is that, at this price, most users will expect it to be more than a compact camera and might therefore feel somewhat frustated when using it. Personnally, I didn't own a compact camera anyway, so I don't really regret my purchase :-)

I also believe that the overall strategy of Nikon will become easier to understand when they will have released their low end digital SLR camera (which should happen soon according to persistant rumours).

Bernard

2-0 out of 5 stars Nice Pics, Frustrating Camera
The photos I've taken with my Coolpix 5000 are pretty good, though it has a lot of trouble adjusting to indoor lighting, even with the $100 Nikon SB-30 flash attachment.

But this can be a VERY frustrating camera to use. Besides the now-standard but always annoying delay built into virtually any piece of digital equipment (I thought digital was going to make things faster, not slower, didn't you?), the Coolpix 5000 will often just decide it's taken enough pictures for now, thank you very much, and it will do nothing more.

I've gone over and over the instruction manual and can find no hint as to what to do in this situation. I am focused, I have checked lighting, I have my settings correct, I push the button...and then I push it again...and then I push it again, and then again, and again and again and again, and then I hold it down until my finger hurts, and then I just want to throw the stupid camera in front of an asphalt truck. Nothing happens. If I turn it off and then back on, nothing happens. If I turn it off and leave it alone for 24 hours, then it usually is ready to have fun again.

Surprisingly, the kids have lost interest in posing for pictures and are getting a little cranky after waiting 24 hours for the camera to get its act together.

2-0 out of 5 stars "System Control" Failed after a year: $244 Nikon repair
Except for it being unresponsive (by the time it's ready to shoot, the moment is gone) it's been a good camera for the 16 months I've had it... but it failed recently, and Nikon had little to say about why, how, or how I could prevent it from happening again. In fact, the people at Penn Camera seemed to be surprised that I wanted to know exactly what work was done ("Nikon never gives that information"). After explaining it by way of analogy---"what if when you picked up your car from repair shop, the serviceman said 'we fixed it... you don't need to know what specifically was wrong, or what we did, you just need to pay up' ... how would you feel? Seems criminal, doesn't it."---they came around, but still couldn't tell me anything.

So... I'm no longer a happy Nikon customer. If you're thinking of buying Nikon products, factor reapir costs in to the price.

5-0 out of 5 stars Give you greatest satisfaction
I am one of many people who recommend this camera. I used many digital cameras including SONY and Olympus camera and got no good impression from those. My recommendation comes from the granularity of pictures taken. Pictures of other cameras found to be deteriorated when magnified using Photoshop. Coolpix 5000 gives clear images even when magnified to 800%! That granularity proves and certifies the sharpest image ever achieved in digital cameras. Every picture taken gives you greatest satisfaction in whatever photo scenes you encounter. ... Read more


67. Nikon N75 35mm SLR Camera (Body Only)

our price: $189.94
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00008ZPN3
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Nikon
Sales Rank: 1401
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Features

  • Multi-CAM 900 Sensor ? 5 focus detection areas offer broad horizontal and vertical coverage
  • 3 AF Area Modes -Dynamic AF - Center Subject Priority Dynamic AF - and Closest Subject Priority Dynamic AF
  • Auto Servo AF locks on the subject, whether stationary or in motion, with unique overlap servo method and NIKON Lock-On technology
  • AF sensors work with every AF Nikkor lens, regardless of maximum aperture
  • 25-segment 3D Matrix Matering employs sophisticated algorithms and a database of more than 30K scenes of actual shooting data

Reviews (12)

4-0 out of 5 stars Very good - but make sure you're comfortable with size
It is essentially a facelift job on Nikon N65 (marketed outside US as F65), and all the good things that can be said about N65 apply to this product, too: it's reliable, it's capable of fully-manual operation (although this can be a little fiddly and N75 will feel more natural in automatic or semi-automatic mode).

Quality of pictures, for the price, is stunning, and in the line-up of entry-to-medium level SLRs this is definitely the one to choose (for example, auto-focus speed beats Canon equivalent hands down; Canon Rebel 300 - marketed outside US as Canon EOS 300 - also looks decidedly like a cheap compact camera with a big lens on top).

For many, many users (including myself) it will provide all the advanced functions that they will ever want. Pricier "professional" cameras like N80 are of course more robust and may have a few extra features or even faster AF, but the difference in price will be so significant that you will have to be a heavy user to make a more expensive camera pay for itself.

The only reservation about N75 is the size: Nikon tried to make this camera as small as possible, which makes it more agreeable for delicate hands (or so they think). For someone like me, a person with bigger paws, it does not feel right - it is just not chunky enough to provide a good grip: a lightweight camera it might be, but still it is no compact thing which you could put in your shirt pocket. This is an important consideration: all the good features will bring you no joy if you feel awkward holding the camera in your hands.

5-0 out of 5 stars One great camera
This camera is amazing. I've been using one for about 5 months and I'm amazed at the high quality pictures I've gotten. The camera has a lot of advanced features that allow even someone new to SLR photography to take excellent pictures. The camera also includes 4 priority modes which allow you to develope even more as a better photographer.

The lens that comes with the camera is a 28-80mm f3.3-5.6 Nikkor. This is a good all around lens. I used it for the first three months solo before getting a 70-300mm lens. I still use the 28-80 a lot, but if you plan on continuing taking pictures, then you should get a bigger telephoto lens.

The camera is very easy to use and if you get one, experiment with all the functions on the camera. You will most likely be very happy with the results.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Camera f
This is a great camera for amateurs because it has Nikon quality at a great price. Please don't think cheap piece of crap, though. Its zoom isn't great but thats why it's for amateurs. Note: NOT FOR BEGINNERS FOR THAT A SIMPLE POINT AND SHOOT WILL DO. It's easy to load and to use. And has a dicent flash syncro of 1/90. I also reccomend a Quantaray Filter to replace the lense cap becuse after a while the lense cap get extremely annoying.

4-0 out of 5 stars Need to know something about the N75
I now own a N60 which does not work with an external flash, I would like to know before purchasing this one if the external flash would work with it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent, economical SLR
I love my Nikon N75 - it's by far the best camera I've ever owned. I've had it for several months now, and have taken the best pictures of my life with it. A great first SLR, due to the ability to leave it in fully automatic mode at first, and then start using the expanded features as you learn.

I mainly wanted to write this review to debunk the 'error' a previous reviewer was complaining about. They really should read the owner's manual... The 'film not loaded error icon' that they are talking about is used in two ways on this camera. If when you first load the film, something goes wrong, this will blink to indicate the film was not loaded correctly. The second use is as a 'low-film' indicator. When you're looking through the viewfinder, this light will blink when you hit 5 exposures left. It's obviously meant to let you know you're getting close to the end of your film, so you don't miss that 'perfect shot' due to running our of film. The fact that the reviewer went through several of these cameras, and never figured this out astounds me. I've never had to contact Nikon support, but I would hope that the support person I got would be a little more knowledgeable than the people she talked too...

Overall, if you're looking to get started with an SLR, you can't go wrong with this camera. I would, however, suggest that you visit your local Ritz (or equivilent camera shop) to hold onto the camera, and compare it to a few others. I was all set to buy a Canon Rebel Ti, based soley on reviews - until I went to the shop. It just felt wrong in my hands, where the Nikon felt perfect. It's all a matter of personal preferrence, so you'll want to make sure you're getting the right one.

I've also been pretty hard on this camera since I got it (Ritz has an optional replacement warranty, so I've not been too worried) - including getting it soaked on a boat trip. It's kept on going through everything I've thrown at it - very durable.

Pros:

-Can be used as a point-and-shoot when needed (or while learning)
-Has the ability to control every aspect of the picture taking process.
-Great built in flash
-Amazing 25 point 3D metering system
-Controls are all easily accesible while holding the camera
-In my opinion, it just feels sturdier and more comfortable in your hand than the Canon Rebel Ti - Canon's equivilant camera

Cons:
-Being an SLR, it's a little on the big side. It is, however, lighter than you might expect. Basically, you have to be making the commitment to carrying it around with you. For this, I'd highly recommend one of the lowepro bags - they're about the smallest you can get for this type of camera. ... Read more


68. Nikon Action 12x50 EX Extreme ATB Binocular

our price: Too low to display
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0001EFIFW
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Nikon Sport Optics
Sales Rank: 3087
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Features

  • Waterproof, fogproof, and shockproof performance
  • All-metal chassis in lightweight polycarbonate shell
  • Rubber-coated body for firm, non-slip grip
  • Magnification: 12x
  • Objective lens: 50mm

69. Nikon 440 ProStaff Laser Range Finder
list price: $299.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0002H2ZYA
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Nikon Sport Optics
Sales Rank: 4011
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Product Description

Key Features: _ Incredible one half yard accuracy _ Original Digital Processor _ 8 power Multicoated optics _ Ranges distances from 11- 440 yards _ Focusing Diopter _ Scanning Capability _ Water Resistant _ Lightweight 7oz _ Battery Included The performance packed Pro Staff Laser 440 features Nikon's original digital processor and a 437 yard maximum range for a true reading on whatever your quarry, even if partially screened by grass or brush. Offering true half yard accuracy and pocket sized portability, the Pro Staff 440 integrates eight power multicoated optics and a focusing diopter so you can get the job done in the field. ... Read more

Features

  • 8x multicoated optics
  • 437 yard range
  • Full scanning capability
  • Water Resistant
  • 1/2 yard accuracy

70. NIKON 10.5MM f/2.8 G IF-ED Fisheye Lens

(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B000144I30
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Nikon
Sales Rank: 2601
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Features

  • DX-Nikkor reduces the diameter of the lens' image circle, allowing a range of lenses with practical size and excellent performance
  • DX-Nikkor lenses offer compact and lightweight design, fast aperture and fast autofocus via NIKON's Silent Wave Motor design
  • 180 degree diagonal angle-of-view
  • Close range focusing up to a near 5.5 inches
  • Innnovative Close Range Correction ( CRC ) technology ensures consistently crisp, sharp images

Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful Lens
I bought this for my Nikon d70 and I barely take it off the body. I nkow it is a special application lens but it really versitile. Can be converted to standard wide angle with Nikon Capture software, this works well , but obviously you lose some of the image, not least the funky effect. I feel like i am zooming out a mile with this lens. Very very pleased. Expensive, but a lot of very nicely made glass and you will use it for years. ... Read more


71. Nikon Coolpix 2500 2MP Digital Camera w/ 3x Optical Zoom

Asin: B0000635UX
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Nikon
Sales Rank: 2241
Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Features

  • 2-megapixel sensor captures 1,600 x 1,200 images for prints at sizes up to 8 x 10 inches
  • Autofocus lens with 3x optical/4x digital (12x total) zoom
  • Included 8 MB CompactFlash card holds 15 images at default settings
  • Connects with PCs and Macs via USB port
  • Uses proprietary lithium-ion rechargeable battery(included)

Reviews (86)

4-0 out of 5 stars A friendly camera that looks cool
Nikon Coolpix 2500 is a great compact camera. I wanted to buy a camera that can work in an easy to use automatic mode for point & click situations like parties, casual travel; and also provides manual mode for experimenting & control. My choice was mainly between Coolpix 2500, Coolpix 995 & Canon Elph Series. I just fell for the cool styling of 2500 and the ability to carry it in my shirt pocket.

I just took it out to Australia for a week long trip. It has performed well under different lighting conditions. All I needed to do was change the "SCENE".The camera allows me to identify the type of scene I am going to photograph. It has a bunch of "SCENE" that I can select from. Some of them are - Beach, Landscape, Party, Portrait, Night Landscape, Backlight to name a few. I was also able to take night shots of the Opera house & the Harbor Bridge in the "night landscape" mode. They came out pretty well. I was happy to see the result in about 2 seconds - the duration of the exposure. Pictures taken in bright daylight like that on a beach also came of well. What disappointed was the photgraphs that I took at a night Bar-be-Q party. In most photographs, the people close to the camera looked bright and those away by more than 7-8 feet away from the camera looked dark. Another "scene" that I found useful was "Close Up". I wanted to note down a recepie from a local magazine. Instead of taking notes I just photographed the page in the "Close Up" mode. Now, I do not have to write them down ! I just read the recepie off the picture stored on my computer. It is not much of a "Manual" camera. So if you want to control everything, I recommend look else where.

I found the controls easy to use. There are a bunch of on-screen menu items, buttons & knobs. They are well layed out and are intitutive to use. Let me add - I am a techie. I can handle complexity. I had my first picture in about 10 minutes opening the box and charging the batteries. It took me about 1 hour to understand all the controls & install the software.

You got to buy a memory card unless you intend to save your pictures in a very basic picture format (like 640 X??). I bought a 128 MB card. It stores about 140 pictures in best quality mode (called "FINE"). The camera can be put on a tripod. That is a big plus for night photography. It is very easy to put my fingers on the lens. So I have to worry about it all the time, specially while opening or closing the lens. A price for this cool design!

In a nutshell I find Nikon Coolpix 2500 a fun, easy to use camera for easy going photography.

3-0 out of 5 stars Very good but not the best
I'll get one thing out of the way. I bought this camera mainly because it looked cool. I was shopping for a digital camera in an electronics market (I live in Asia) and was looking for something in the 2.0 megapixel range. I ran across the CoolPix 2500 and the design of it definitely caught my eye. I looked at it for a while, toyed around and decided I wanted to buy it. While it's definitely a good camera, it's not the best.

On the whole, I thought this camera was pretty good. One thing that sets the Nikon CoolPix line of cameras apart from everything else is its swivel lens design. This is clever because when you're not using it, it covers the lens. No need to worry about broken lens covers or scratched lenses anymore. Plus it helps getting angled shots much easier. No more craning your neck to get a shot above of below you, just tilt the lens. It's a whole lot more useful than you'd think.

The picture quality of this in general is pretty good. The colors come out accurately and the pictures are clear. However, the night exposure could be better, although it's good enough to pass without any qualms. A big problem that's related to night time shots however is red eye. It's always there and it never seems to go away. I managed to minimize it using the different scene settings, but it just never completely leaves. It gets sort of annoying after a while, but it's something most people can live with.

Also, the camera tends to feel on the fragile side. Whenever I put it in my pocket, I always feel like it's going to break any second. Of course it's never happened and I realize that it'll take quite a bit to knock it out of commission, but it does have that light easily breakable feeling that I can never seem to shrug off.

Some other minor complaints is that there is no video output straight to a TV and there is no optical viewfinder, although the optical viewfinder part isn't really too big of a problem. Also, there is no protection for the LCD screen. Something along the lines of what Sony does with their cameras would have been a good protective measure to take with the screen.

With all these negative aspects to it, you would think that I wouldn't like it, but that isn't the case. It still is a good camera and it's a blast to use. The visual quality is still fairly good and has a bunch of nifty features to it, namely the swivel lens. And besides, whenever you pull it out in front of other people and you swing the lens, everyone will go "ooohhhhhh."

5-0 out of 5 stars Best Point 'N' Shoot and Quality for The Money
First off, let me say unlike EVERYONE that praises the Nikon Coolpix 2500, I could NOT care less for the cool styling and design. What do I mean? Well, my number ONE priority was the ongoing search for a compact pocket "point and shoot" camera for the least money (of course not compromising quality!) that I can carry anywhere like I carry my cell phone, period.

Since then, that is exactly what happened. I've used it just about everywhere and anywhere without feeling I had to treat it with "kid-gloves" and worry about its well being whenever taking it out for any type of use. All of you who have owned expensive cameras will appreciate THIS priceless feeling. It takes great pictures and is LOADED with user-friendly features which at one time or another are all incredibly useful... and best of all? It remains a pocket camera!

If you are the creative and resourceful type, you will notice the swiveling inner zoom lens is useful to capture photos from just about any angle. In fact, I've used it many times to take a close-up picture of a friend and myself if there is no one to take the photo for you. Not to mention, you have a timer feature also. Given the professional field I'm in, I also use it for close ups to capture telephone numbers and names on signs, billboards, and magazine pages with any writing or information on it.

ONE negative (or else I would have given it 5 1/2 stars)...the 8 MB CompactFlash card that it comes with...well,... It's useless (for the 15 images it holds at default settings). Upgrade to at least a 128 MB CompactFlash Memory Card, hence add an approximate [$$]-[$$] to your original purchase price - well worth it. At default settings (which is GOOD quality) I've taken over 300+ pictures without worrying of running out of film,.. umm, I mean memory, before docking the Coolpix2500 to my PC for download. Speaking of, once you connect via USB port, in only ONE click, you are downloading your pics...and as for the proprietary lithium-ion rechargeable battery which is included? Very nice.

Ironically, I never read any reviews at the time of my purchase in the early part of the year. In fact, as I later found out it was the first few days the Coolpix 2500 was out on the market. Therefore for me, it was three and a half-hours of in-store experimenting with ALL the digital cams priced nywhere from [$$$]-[$$$].

Therefore unlike many people, the "cool" factor never did blur my analysis in arriving to my final decision. So when people approach me and mention how neat my pocket sized Coolpix2500 looks, I always have to respond, "but it also takes great pictures, and check out these features..." Today I view the slick factor and "cool" design as a bonus.

4-0 out of 5 stars Loooove
I absolutely adored this camera! It was my first digital camera, and I took over 2,000 picures with it during the time it lasted, however it has now died completely (won't turn on most of the time and when it does the screen reads "Error") and I have only had it for about a year and a half. So, now I have to look for a new camera.

1-0 out of 5 stars Terrible design.....
I agree, it looks really cool. Everything on this camera is perfect OTHER than the flash. It is less than 1/8th an inch from the lense, this cameras only major downside. When you take a picture everything up close is white and everything behiend that is black. Trying to take a picture of somthing that might be a little reflective? Too bad! I tried to take some pictures of a plastic computer case, and the flash created a lovely white glare on it, obscuring everything but the background, which was turned a lovely shade of black. Turn the flash off you say? Well, then the pictures get even blurrier. Yes, the pictures are always blurry. I am yet to get a good, non blurry picture from this camera. The camera figures "Well the flash is off so I should keep the shutter open for a half of a second". Most pictures from this camera make it look like a huge earthquake is in progress. Avoid this camera at all costs! I give Nikon some credit for trying to give this camera a cool look, but they could have moved the flash! Have they ever heard of product testers?? ... Read more


72. Nikon N80 35mm SLR Camera (Body Only)

our price: $364.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00006I5JT
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Nikon
Sales Rank: 2266
Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars
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Features

  • The N80 is a sophisticated SLR camera body that's designed for excellent performance with flexibility to meet virtually all of your photographic needs. Whether you choose automatic, manual or assisted modes, the N80 offers outstanding results
  • 10-segment 3D, Center and Spot metering for auto and manual exposure modes
  • Nikon advanced focusing in auto and manual modes
  • Uses all Nikon F Lenses (AF Series for autofocus capabilities) - Lens is not included
  • Comprehensive viewfinder information

Reviews (5)

4-0 out of 5 stars Good, but......
I've used Nikon equipment for well over 20 years and this is my fourth Nikon body. It's also my first Nikon auto focus/auto exposure body.

Frankly, the only reason that I bought this camera is my deteriorating middle-aged eyesight. Focusing with my FM series bodies has become dfficult in all but the brightest situations.

The features that this camera offers are excellent. The auto focus works well enough although it hunts in situations where the lighting isn't optimal. Like many owners, I've turned off the annoying auto focus aid light so I really can't complain much.

By the way, the weakest auto focus performance is with the very lenses that Nikon pushes with this model....the variable aperture zooms. I have no difficulty with my primes but with my 28-105 zoom the N80 hunts for focus quite a bit.

Speaking of lenses. Don't fall into the trap of getting an N80 as a "kit" with the Nikkor 28-80 zoom (or, worse yet, some other brand). Not that the Nikkor 28-80 is all that bad, but if you're serious enough about photography to want the N80 you're probably better off putting the money towards a better piece of glass.

I won't suggest getting the "pro" Nikkor zooms. They cost a fortune and weigh a ton. However, you won't go wrong with either the 28-105 or the new 28-85 AF-S.

My favorite lenses (and the reason why I've used Nikons for all these years) are the primes. Put together a kit consisting of the 24mm 2.8, 50mm 1.8 and 85mm 1.8 and you'll be ready for most anything. If you need something longer, there are a load of options from primes to the really great (and expensive) Nikkor 80-200 zoom.

The exposure modes are versatile and metering is as accurate as you can get short of spending [...]on an F5. In other words, more than sufficient for all but the most demanding user.

The rinky-dink onboard flash works better than it has any right to. Very accurate as a fill flash. As with all on-camera flashes, one risks red eye. Still, for a built-in, it's a pleasant surprise.

I have to take exception with Nikon for printing a manual that's mostly gibberish. No worse than its competition I suppose but can't they explain the auto-focus options in less than a million words? I figured it all out...no thanks to the manual.

Maybe I'm old fashioned about these things, but why are today's SLR's so complicated? Who really needs all these different modes and overides and compensations and.......well you get the idea.

Although I knew this when I bought the N80, I'm very disappointed in not being able to meter with any of my Nikkor manual focus lenses. Would it really have brought the price up that much to add such a feature? Like many Nikon users, I have/had a collection of older lenses that I'd like to be able to use. I've sold quite a few and replaced them with AF models but it's like having ones pocket picked.

Many have complained about the polycarbonate bodies of todays cameras and the poor construction of the lenses. Having cut my teeth on metal cameras, I really have no complaint about the build quality of the N80. I can't imagine anyone but a pro actually wearing one out. [...]

Handling is excellent (as I've come to expect from Nikon) and battery life is pretty good as well. I'm not a big flash user
so YMMV.

The bottom line is that I'm pretty much satisfied with all aspects of this camera. I just wish that Nikon had taken its existing customer base into account and designed the camera to meter with the AI and AIS lenses. I guess that customer loyalty means very little to companies these days.

EDITED: Sorry to say I just sold this camera and the 28-105 Nikkor zoom lens. They simply don't suit my style of photography. Having to re-set several controls and check the cheat sheet each time I want to make a small adjustment is just ridiculous....at least for me.

I just bought a used Leica M6 and 50mm Summicron that are much simpler to use and give me better results under most conditions. These old eyes of mine love the bright viewfinder and I'm getting perfect focusing under much dimmer lighting than I ever could with an SLR.

Nothing against the N80 (I'm keeping my other Nikon gear) but it's just not for me.

5-0 out of 5 stars The perfect camera for the serious amateur
Photography has been a hobby of mine for nearly ten years now. Having shot on a lot of Minolta and Canon I can say that Nikon equipment is sufficiently superior to its competition unless you are in need of fast auto focus (i.e. for sports) where Canon tends to rule. However, in nearly every other arena in the 35mm SLR world Nikon is at the top of the list. From build and lens quality, to controls and light meters Nikon beats out the competition. So if you are already sold on buying a Nikon (which you should be) the N80 is a great pick for the serious amateur or beginner, but probably a little bit too high on the food chain for the casual photographer.

The N80 fits nicely between the N55, N65, N75 cameras and the F100, F1 cameras. The F100 and F1 (as well as the D100 and D1) are geared for the professional photographer and provide quality and features only an experienced amateur or pro could notice. Those cameras are definitely not appropriate as first cameras unless you are serious and just have money to burn. The N55 and N65 are geared toward the casual consumer that wants more quality than a point and shoot offers, but likely doesn't really know or care much about photography. These cameras provide "easy" to use features including some that are simply annoying for the serious photographer. The N80 operates in a very similar manner to the F100, F1, D100 and D1 and it makes the transition to these cameras down the road much easier when the time is right. The N80 also provides 10 segment metering, selectable auto focus regions, composition guides (awesome!) and it opens up features of the more advanced Nikon lenses. Overall the N80's build quality feels better than its smaller counter parts as well.

Who is this camera for:

The serious amateur and student photographer, especially those wishing to move up in the Nikon line in the future.

Also, make sure you get a great lens too, I'd highly recommend the Nikon 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5G ED-IF AF-S Zoom as a first lens.

4-0 out of 5 stars Nikon N80 all the camera most people need...
In the world of traditional film SLRs most amature photographers either underbuy or more likely overbuy. The N80 as Goldylocks once said is just right! The sophisticated features and performance will please all but the working professional photog. The simplicicty of design and ease of use make it a perfect SLR for those who seek an upgrade to point and shoot. The vast array of Nikon and and other lens makers offerings for this body make it enormously attractive as skills and or needs expand. Should the point come that the N80 owner sees value in moving to a semi-pro F100 or a full pro F5 the lens that have been bought will make the transition happily. All a point to be made for those who see a digital SLR in their future. The Nikon AF lenses fully apply to the well reviewed D100, D1x, and newest D1H.
As a performer the camera is a gem. The focusing and metering systems are very effective and well exceed the performance of pro cameras made just whithin the last few years. Auto focus is fast and well aided by the built in low light feature. The built in speedlight works very effectively for most indoor applications and reasonably well as an outdoor fill light.
All considered there are few offerings in the market today that will please the user as well as the N80.

4-0 out of 5 stars very very good..........
I was using a minolta X300, and decided it was time for an upgrade, after trying out some camera's in the shop, i decided on the Nikon N80...now i have only ran 3 films through it but am finding the autofocus a little tedious, once focused on something i only have to move it slightly and it focuses on something else in the viewfinder, although it does have another focus mode as yet untried and autofocus lock which i havn't tried out yet, if this fails then i will be shooting in manual focus mode. The other gripe i have with it is some of the controls are small and difficult to use, and virtually impossible with gloves on. i am using Tamron lenses with the body and am getting very sharp pictures.
The autofilm loading is a blessing compared to doing it myself and autorewind which is really fast, because of the autofilm advance i am finding i am using film really quickly, and thats without the autowinder at 2.5 frames per second, i just don't realise how many pictures i am taking as it winds on automatically.
I guess to sum this body up i would say if you are looking for an autofocus camera with a few bells and whistles to play with, then this is a very good choice, i am an amateur with NO experience with autofocus, so i have a lot to learn as yet, but am very happy with my choice and looking forward to finding out all it has to offer, bear in mind i have just come from a camera with which i had to do everything myself and i think i'm just a little confused at all the automated features now available to me

1-0 out of 5 stars not worth it
interesting - there used to be at least a dozen reviews of this camera on this site, but they seem to have been removed.

I bought this camera, found it too complicated and difficult to use, with tiny controls that were very inconvenient and hard to maneuver. I constantly had to have the instruction booklet with me. I ended up trading the N80 to a camera shop for a very good lens.

Maybe some people think that autofocus is worth the trouble, but I didn't.

Here's the main point. Nikon cameras are wonderful because the lenses are so good. I think new photographers make a very big mistake if they spend a lot of money on a Nikon camera body, and then buy a cheap lens to go with it.

My recommendation is this: Buy the cheapest Nikon camera body you can find, and then save your money for the best lenses. It's the lens that's capturing the image, not the body ... Read more


73. AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor 24-120mm f/3.5-5.6G ED-IF

(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00009VQG6
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Nikon
Sales Rank: 5337
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Features

  • G Type DX Nikkor is intended exclusively for NIKON SLRs where aperture is controlled from body
  • 24-120mm Focal Length
  • Maximum Aperture -f/3.5 - 5.6
  • Minimum F Stop -f/22 - 36
  • Silent Wave Motor enables ultra high speed, accurate and super quiet autofocus operation

74. Nikon 10-22x50 Action Zoom XL Binoculars

our price: $147.94
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0002INMK0
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Nikon Sport Optics
Sales Rank: 4381
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

75. Nikon N75 35mm SLR Camera Kit with 28-80mm f3.5-5.6 Nikkor Lens

our price: $299.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00009WO84
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Nikon
Sales Rank: 751
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Features

  • More Portable - This Nikon SLR is compact and light enough for anyone to handle.
  • Enhanced Versatility - With fully automatic mode and five Vari-Program modes.
  • Sharper Pictures -Five-Area Dynamic Autofocus.
  • Nikkor Lens - 28-80mm f3.5-3.6
  • Superior Exposure - 25-Segment 3D Matrix Metering to capture scene in detail

Reviews (12)

4-0 out of 5 stars Very good - but make sure you're comfortable with size
It is essentially a facelift job on Nikon N65 (marketed outside US as F65), and all the good things that can be said about N65 apply to this product, too: it's reliable, it's capable of fully-manual operation (although this can be a little fiddly and N75 will feel more natural in automatic or semi-automatic mode).

Quality of pictures, for the price, is stunning, and in the line-up of entry-to-medium level SLRs this is definitely the one to choose (for example, auto-focus speed beats Canon equivalent hands down; Canon Rebel 300 - marketed outside US as Canon EOS 300 - also looks decidedly like a cheap compact camera with a big lens on top).

For many, many users (including myself) it will provide all the advanced functions that they will ever want. Pricier "professional" cameras like N80 are of course more robust and may have a few extra features or even faster AF, but the difference in price will be so significant that you will have to be a heavy user to make a more expensive camera pay for itself.

The only reservation about N75 is the size: Nikon tried to make this camera as small as possible, which makes it more agreeable for delicate hands (or so they think). For someone like me, a person with bigger paws, it does not feel right - it is just not chunky enough to provide a good grip: a lightweight camera it might be, but still it is no compact thing which you could put in your shirt pocket. This is an important consideration: all the good features will bring you no joy if you feel awkward holding the camera in your hands.

5-0 out of 5 stars One great camera
This camera is amazing. I've been using one for about 5 months and I'm amazed at the high quality pictures I've gotten. The camera has a lot of advanced features that allow even someone new to SLR photography to take excellent pictures. The camera also includes 4 priority modes which allow you to develope even more as a better photographer.

The lens that comes with the camera is a 28-80mm f3.3-5.6 Nikkor. This is a good all around lens. I used it for the first three months solo before getting a 70-300mm lens. I still use the 28-80 a lot, but if you plan on continuing taking pictures, then you should get a bigger telephoto lens.

The camera is very easy to use and if you get one, experiment with all the functions on the camera. You will most likely be very happy with the results.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Camera f
This is a great camera for amateurs because it has Nikon quality at a great price. Please don't think cheap piece of crap, though. Its zoom isn't great but thats why it's for amateurs. Note: NOT FOR BEGINNERS FOR THAT A SIMPLE POINT AND SHOOT WILL DO. It's easy to load and to use. And has a dicent flash syncro of 1/90. I also reccomend a Quantaray Filter to replace the lense cap becuse after a while the lense cap get extremely annoying.

4-0 out of 5 stars Need to know something about the N75
I now own a N60 which does not work with an external flash, I would like to know before purchasing this one if the external flash would work with it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent, economical SLR
I love my Nikon N75 - it's by far the best camera I've ever owned. I've had it for several months now, and have taken the best pictures of my life with it. A great first SLR, due to the ability to leave it in fully automatic mode at first, and then start using the expanded features as you learn.

I mainly wanted to write this review to debunk the 'error' a previous reviewer was complaining about. They really should read the owner's manual... The 'film not loaded error icon' that they are talking about is used in two ways on this camera. If when you first load the film, something goes wrong, this will blink to indicate the film was not loaded correctly. The second use is as a 'low-film' indicator. When you're looking through the viewfinder, this light will blink when you hit 5 exposures left. It's obviously meant to let you know you're getting close to the end of your film, so you don't miss that 'perfect shot' due to running our of film. The fact that the reviewer went through several of these cameras, and never figured this out astounds me. I've never had to contact Nikon support, but I would hope that the support person I got would be a little more knowledgeable than the people she talked too...

Overall, if you're looking to get started with an SLR, you can't go wrong with this camera. I would, however, suggest that you visit your local Ritz (or equivilent camera shop) to hold onto the camera, and compare it to a few others. I was all set to buy a Canon Rebel Ti, based soley on reviews - until I went to the shop. It just felt wrong in my hands, where the Nikon felt perfect. It's all a matter of personal preferrence, so you'll want to make sure you're getting the right one.

I've also been pretty hard on this camera since I got it (Ritz has an optional replacement warranty, so I've not been too worried) - including getting it soaked on a boat trip. It's kept on going through everything I've thrown at it - very durable.

Pros:

-Can be used as a point-and-shoot when needed (or while learning)
-Has the ability to control every aspect of the picture taking process.
-Great built in flash
-Amazing 25 point 3D metering system
-Controls are all easily accesible while holding the camera
-In my opinion, it just feels sturdier and more comfortable in your hand than the Canon Rebel Ti - Canon's equivilant camera

Cons:
-Being an SLR, it's a little on the big side. It is, however, lighter than you might expect. Basically, you have to be making the commitment to carrying it around with you. For this, I'd highly recommend one of the lowepro bags - they're about the smallest you can get for this type of camera. ... Read more


76. NIKON 62mm UV Haze Filter

(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00005LE7B
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Nikon
Sales Rank: 3119
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77. Nikon StabilEyes 12x32 Team Realtree Binocular
list price: $1,299.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0002I95QU
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Nikon Sport Optics
Sales Rank: 5814
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Product Description

The image stabilized StabilEyes offers hunters rock-steady, high magnification viewing and spotting in a waterproof/fogproof package. Hand-holding a high magnification binocular is difficult, but when it's cold outside, it's windy - or you're just plain excited - getting a sharp, steady image can be nearly impossible. Nikon developed the StabilEyes binoculars to effectively eliminate those blurred high magnification images. To achieve this incredible image stabilization, StabilEyes used a servo control system with the prisms supported by gimbals to provide a view that is unaffected by either shake or vibration. All lenses are fully multicoated, and all prisms are phase-correction coated for the ultimate in brightness and resolution. Uses 2 AA batteries, included. -Focusing System- Center Focus-Magnification- 12X-Objective Diameter- 32mm-Angular field of view (real)- 5-Angular field of view (apparent)- 60-Field of view at 1000 yards- 261 ft.-Close Focus Distance- 11.5 ft.-Exit Pupil- 2.7 mm-Relative Brightness- 7.3-Eye Relief- 15mm-Length- 7" (179mm)-Width- 5.6" (142mm)-Weight (without batteries)- 38.8 oz. (1100 grams) ... Read more

Features

  • VR pause button
  • 12x magnification with image stabilization
  • +/-3 degree vibration compensation
  • 32mm objective lens diameter
  • Waterproof and fogproof

78. Nikon One Touch 90s QD Zoom Date 35mm Camera

our price: Too low to display
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0000643QY
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Nikon
Sales Rank: 1378
Average Customer Review: 3.33 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Features

  • 38mm-90mm (2.5x) zoom lens ensures sharp, clear pictures
  • Macro/Close Up focuses to wihin 12 inches
  • Real image zoom viewfinder for easier viewing
  • Built-in 10 second self timer
  • 5-mode built-in flash

Reviews (9)

1-0 out of 5 stars fuzzy pictures
I have to say right up front this camera takes fuzzy pictures! we cannot figure out why! If we eliminate using the zoom that reduces the fuzzy pictures but we still get 2 or 3 in the roll. I recently took a picture of my daughter smiling for the first time and was so excited about gettting the film developed. Of course, there were 2 pictures fuzzy and one was the pic of my daughter smiling. I was mortified. I do not recommend this camera at all and am shopping for a new one. I did look up on the internet and not often but i did find another person with the same problem. I would have taken the camera back but it did not start this problem until 4 or 5 months into use!

5-0 out of 5 stars Good, Economical Camera
If you still want a film camera and don't want to break the bank, this camera is a perfect candidate. Probably the best feature of this Nikon camera that even Nikon's literature won't tell you is the design. No I'm not talking about the way it looks, but rather where things are located. For once a camera maker has located the flash in correct proximity to the lense! Compare this camera to the others when you are in the store (or even online for that matter). The flash is located farther away from the lense than on pretty much all the other makes and models I've looked at. Why is this important you ask? This is one of the few cameras I tried in my quest for a new camera that did not produce garish red-eye. I didn't even need to use the mostly gimmicky red-eye reducing feature to get good pictures. I maybe get one picture per roll that exibits noticeable red-eye... and my house has poor lighting to boot. If the flash on a camera is located far enough away from the lense you don't have the red-eye problem so prevalent in the increasingly tiny cameras you see nowadays. Kudos Nikon! You got it right! Watch... they'll discontinue this design next week or something. Also, the majority of pictures I took were very clear, exhibiting as much, and in some photos, more detail than some of the more expensive, feature laden cameras I tried. I tried Pentax, Olympus, and Canon's new U line. The only issue I have with this camera is the shutter speed (1/200th of a second). If your subject moves quickly, which kids often do... expect some blurred photos. But all the portrait-type shots I took, where the subject was still, were very clear and detailed. Photos taken between 4 to 8 feet were excellent. Photos taken further away or using the zoom extended to max are good, but I wouldn't say excellent, they do appear a little grainy and sometimes out of focus, but I noticed graininess when using the zoom on ALL the little point-n-shoots I tried. Also when using this camera, there is a little circle in the viewfinder used to lock the focus on the subject. This is very accurate, or shall I say touchy, because you need to place the circle EXACTLY on what you want to be in focus. If you place the circle on the subject's shirt, the shirt may be crystal clear, but the person's face a tad out of focus. This is a perfect camera for taking head-n-shoulder group or individual portrait shots. For the price you pay for this, it takes very capable pictures and you don't have to stress about red-eye, mainly because it is built right. I would give this camera 4 stars because of the slower shutter speed, but because it's one of the few cameras I've come across where the lense and flash are laid out correctly, combined with the value pricing, I give it 5 stars.

4-0 out of 5 stars Kevin
This camera is a great buy. The timer function is great for when you want everyone in the picture and there is no stranger around to take it. I have taken many family pictures this way. All pictures seem to turn out great despite our lack of photography knowledge. I liked ours so much, I bought one for my mom and she finally gave up her disposable camera addiction. The result is that she too gets great pictures. Some cameras have too many bells and whistles and some not enough...this one is just right.

1-0 out of 5 stars Viewfinder Not Worth a Second Look
I purchased this product online without a test drive. My bad!! The viewfinder is in an awkward location and causes painful eye strain when shooting multiple times. Picture quality is poor. I am shopping for a replacement.....

1-0 out of 5 stars Don't believe the description
I bought this camera on line relying on the description which stated that the battery was included. I had some events which I wanted to take pictures of immediately and felt that having the battery included would allow me to take immediate pictures, and also felt that not having to buy a new battery (or two) would increase the value of this purchase. When I received the camera it did not have a battery, I did report it to the customer service but its been two weeks with no satisfaction. It seems like a good camera, but I'm returning it as "missing a part." ... Read more


79. Nikon Action 10x50 EX Extreme ATB Binocular

our price: $179.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0001HKIK4
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Nikon Sport Optics
Sales Rank: 3214
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Features

  • Waterproof, fogproof, and shockproof performance
  • All-metal chassis in lightweight polycarbonate shell
  • Rubber-coated body for firm, non-slip grip
  • Magnification: 10x
  • Objective lens: 50mm

80. Nikon Lite Touch 130 ED/QD Zoom Date 35mm Camera

Asin: B0000643EK
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Nikon
Sales Rank: 3673
Average Customer Review: 3.73 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com Product Description

Effortlessly take photographs of sweeping mountain ranges and close-ups of flowers with Nikon's 130 35mm camera. Weighing only 6.7 ounces, the compact 130 gives you a wide range of shooting options with its 3.4x (38-130mm) zoom lens. The passive autofocus system lets you effortlessly take sharp photos without taking you out of the moment. The built-in, pop-up flash illuminates clearly with five modes of operation, and the red-eye reduction feature always comes in handy. The viewfinder has easy frame marks to help you center your image properly, and the diopter adjustment makes viewing easy for every user.

The panorama mode creates wide photos for that special creative touch. Film operation is fully automatic, including film loading, frame advance, rewind, and midroll rewind to make operations a snap. With the built-in quartz date function you can print the time and date onto the pictures you take. Also, the 10-second self-timer is perfect for those group photos. The sliding cover prevents damage to the lens when you are not using it. ... Read more

Features

  • The world’s smallest and lightest 35mm compact camera with sliding lens cover and 3.4x zoom
  • 38mm-130mm (3.4x) Nikon Zoom lens, featuring exclusive Nikon ED glass lens technology for incredibly sharp photographs
  • Up to 628-step, wide-area passive Autofocus system ensures focusing accuracy for great pictures
  • Real-image zoom viewfinder with diopter adjustment for easier viewing
  • Built-in Pop-up flash features 5-mode operation; quartz date allows you to imprint the date/time

Reviews (11)

3-0 out of 5 stars Update on this camera
Ok, I took this camera to Key West and Mexico and found that the quality of my photos were "OK" meaning they weren't exceptional like my old Nikon Zoom Touch. The pictures weren't as clear as Nikon quality is. Even though I had used the HD Kodak film. I'm still on my regular role of Kodak 400 film, so I will update again. Usually with high end cameras you get high quality photos and crisp pictures but not with Kodak HD film in this camera. The pictures were grainy and not sharp quality, but... it might be the film I used on my trip so you'll have to wait for and update.

2-0 out of 5 stars Very fuzzy closeups!!!
I bought this camera for my daughter for her baby shower and am very disappointed. It is not up to par for the Nikon name. Point and shoot quality very nice, BUT any close shots taken were very fuzzy!!! Not good when shooting pictures of a newborn baby! Every roll developed had poor quality pictures of her.

3-0 out of 5 stars Not Satisfied
My Canon Sure Shot was the best camera I ever had. After a few years, the flash wouldnt recharge. I purchased the Nikon based on the new lenses claiming high clearity. I havent seen the clearity. Delays from the focus feature is another disappointment. If given the choice again, I would purchase the Canon Sure Shot and pay the difference.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great, compact, point and shoot
I tried the Pentax 130, the Canon 115u, an Olympus Stylus 120 all with the same result... a trip back to the store with a camera to return. The Pentax took great pictures, but had horrendous red-eye issues. The Canon had red-eye issues and the pictures seemed dark and underexposed. The Olympus Stylus was nice, did not have red-eye problems, but too many of the photos came out fuzzy and seemed slightly out of focus. And to be fair I developed the photos from all of the above at the same place. Since I liked the Olympus, but wasn't pleased with the results, I bought the Nikon Lite Touch 130, which has a similar body style to the Olympus with the sliding front cover and pop-up flash. The pictures I took with the Nikon Lite Touch 130 were very clear and in focus, had minimal to no red-eye, and were the most color-accurate of any of the cameras I tried. The photos I took with the zoom also turned out great. Note: using zoom over about 90mm on distant subjects will probably produce somewhat grainier photos unless you use a tripod and at least 800 speed film. The main reason I like a higher zoom is so you can zoom in on a subject which is fairly close and in focus, while at the same time achieving a blurred background effect. Also, to be fair all these little point and shoot cameras have a fairly long delay before the picture is taken for two reasons: ONE - It takes a moment for the camera to focus on the subject, and TWO - if you use the red eye reducer at all, it takes another moment for the red eye reducer to activate before the picture snaps. I am a perfectionist and know what I want to see. I'm finally seeing it with this camera. The Nikon Lite Touch line is a little more spendy than comparable brands, but well worth the money in my opinion. I would highly recommend any of the Nikon line, particularily the Lite Touch 130 and Lite Touch 150, for their superb optics, focusing cababilities, and accurate color matching.

4-0 out of 5 stars Great Shots!
As I have always trusted Nikon. This is the best camera that I have owned since my other Nikon Zoom Touch 400 got to big to carry around. I hated to give up my old camera but this one was the smallest and less bukier camera that I have. I even had to hunt down a Nikon case for it, since no one on the web had the right case for this model. I also searched for the remote that was optional and it wasn't cheap ($25) so I said, "don't really need it". I am a litte concerned about the way cameras are being designed, I don't like the sliding cover as you know things wear out in time. So I am keeping my old camera for back up. Because the sliding cover shuts it on/off, what happens when it wears out. It's hard to find a dependable camera out there with the features and quality that are supposed to be in the camera. I love Nikon but I think the quality of camera is being ignored. ... Read more


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