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Too low to display list($649.99)
41. Canon PowerShot SD500 7.1 MP Digital
Too low to display $299.95 list($640.00)
42. Canon 10x30 Image Stabilization
$225.14 list($249.99)
43. Canon PIXMA MP750 All-in-One Photo
$209.99 list($495.00)
44. Canon Faxphone L80 Laser Fax Printer
Too low to display list($1,699.99)
45. Canon Optura Xi MiniDV Camcorder
Too low to display $924.95 list($2,000.00)
46. Canon 18x50 Image Stabilization
$309.95 list($399.95)
47. Canon Powershot SD20 5MP Ultra
Too low to display $409.99 list($649.99)
48. Canon Elura 80 MiniDV Camcorder
Too low to display $239.95 list($299.99)
49. Canon PowerShot A85 4MP Digital
Too low to display $1,000.00 list($6,499.99)
50. Canon EOS-1D Mark II 8.2MP Digital
Too low to display $389.99 list($599.99)
51. Canon ZR300 MiniDV Camcorder w/22x
Too low to display list($649.00)
52. Canon ZR400 MiniDV Camcorder w/14x
$349.95 $309.95 list($399.95)
53. Canon Powershot SD20 5MP Ultra
Too low to display $309.95 list($399.95)
54. Canon Powershot SD20 5MP Ultra
Too low to display $528.88 list($799.00)
55. Canon Elura 90 MiniDV Camcorder
Too low to display $328.00 list($499.99)
56. Casio Exilim EXZ57 5MP Digital
$129.19 $123.95 list($129.99)
57. Canon CanoScan LiDE 500F Color
Too low to display $159.95 list($199.99)
58. Canon PowerShot A400 3.2MP Digital
Too low to display $774.95 list($1,600.00)
59. Canon 15x50 Image Stabilization
Too low to display $750.00 list($1,199.99)
60. Canon EOS 6.3MP Digital Rebel

41. Canon PowerShot SD500 7.1 MP Digital ELPH Camera with 3x Optical Zoom (Coach Edition)
list price: $649.99
our price: Too low to display
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0007WK8JE
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Canon Cameras US
Sales Rank: 94
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com Product Description

The SD500 is the first Digital ELPH from Canon to be equipped with 7.1 megapixel resolution -- a major step forward for a camera this easy to use. With Canon's exclusive DIGIC II image processor, a big, two-inch LCD screen, and an outstanding set of features and capabilities, the SD500 is a digital camera designed to lead Canon's impressive Digital ELPH line.

The SD500's 7.1 megapixel CCD (the highest resolution in the Digital ELPH line) delivers images with unprecedented detail. Meanwhile, the powerful 3x optical zoom provides plenty of close-up excitement with a focal length equivalent to 37 to 111 millimeters in a 35-millimeter film camera. The camera's stylish new perpetual curve design -- a first in digital cameras -- fits your hands perfectly, and though its body is superbly slim, the SD500 has an oversized two-inch LCD screen that makes for easy framing and playback.

Designed to improve processing speed and image quality, the SD500's DIGIC II processor provides markedly faster camera startup, auto-focus and playback. Plus, it assures that every image is more accurate, with a broader range and vibrant colors. The processor is so fast and powerful that it could change the way even a die-hard film photographer feels about digital camera image quality and performance.

Canon has added nine special scene modes to help you take the best pictures in various situations. "portrait" sets a large aperture, focuses the subject, and artistically blurs the background to make your subject appear clear and bright. "foliage" captures excellent organic shots, like autumn leaves, greenery, or blossoms. "beach" gets clear shots at sunny locales without darkening faces. Other scenes include fireworks, night snapshot, kids and pets, indoor, and snow.

You can also set the camera to "digital macro" to shoot larger-than-life close-ups, or turn the dial to "underwater" to snap images with reduced backscatter, so you'll see the fish and coral, not your flash. If you're interested in taking pictures underwater, you'll want to make sure you pick up the WP-DC70 from Canon -- a waterproof case made especially for the SD500.

Ready for some filmmaking? With this camera, you can shoot great full motion video at an astonishing 60 frames per second (fps) -- perfect for capturing fast moving subjects. Always thinking, Canon designed the SD500 to also offer a 30 fps movie mode that is perfect for creating video files that are small enough to email.

The SD500 is the first of Canon's compact digital cameras to support the USB 2.0 high-speed standard. You'll enjoy the highest data transfer speeds with any USB 2.0 compatible computer, making it easier than ever to download your digital images from the camera and clear your memory card. Also, this camera's performance level is high enough to take full advantage of super-high-speed SD memory cards.

What's in the Box
PowerShot SD500 digital camera, wrist strap, SD memory card, battery pack, battery charger, digital camera solution CD-ROM, AV cable, and interface cable. ... Read more

Features

  • Enhanced movie mode with 60 fps recording
  • 7.1 megapixel digital ELPH camera with curved, metallic body
  • Large, two-inch LCD screen for easy, on-camera viewing
  • DIGIC II image processor for fast processing, crisp colors, and excellent image quality
  • USB 2.0 high-speed support for fast downloads and transfers

Reviews (22)

5-0 out of 5 stars Mindless, professional results
I've been a user of a Canon G3 for 3 years now, but I wanted a high quality/ very compact point and shoot camera for travel.The key here was buying something I or my wife could put into a pocket to carry and not have the quality of the results suffer due to size.

Being a reseach psycho before buying anything, I narrowed the field down to 3:Sony DCXT7, Casio Exilim z750, and the Canon SD500.Then I went to the store to try them out (I can not stress this enough...it is worth the trip to a store to play with these), and the number of cameras being considered went to two.The Sony, the sexiest camera of the group, was so thin it was nearly impossible for me to get a firm hold on (camera shake and red eye are the main problems with small cameras, all three of which have these issues to an extent, but Sony's camera was overly hard to hold, making it by far the worst for camera shake ), so I removed it from consideration...really too compact...plus it was 5 mp vs. 7 on the other two...for the same price.That left the Exilim and Canon.

One note on megapixels...more is better if you like to digitally play with photos on photoshop elements or another program (crop pieces out, etc) or want a 13 X 19 blow up ability should you capture the perfect picture. If neither apply's to you, the SD400 (same feature set, lens, processor) or another 5 mp would work just as well for less money...and give you the highest quality results needed up to 8X10 and a little bigger.Me, I like to play with photos after the shoot, which is why I wanted the extra resolution.

Just picking up and shooting with the SD500 produced great results (easy and mindless), and it was small, but not too small, to work with.My wife does not care about F stops or shutter priority (which it does not have).She wants to pick a subject, snap, and have amazing, mindless 7 mp results that rival the leading current prosumer G6 from Canon.I suspect that a large number of people buying digital camreas want the same thing.

If this is what you want, along with a great movie mode, useful scene modes, longer flash range than any camera this size, and a few fun fuctions (though you can do it on Photoshop, I enjoy the "color swap" (easily swap colors in a picture), & "color accent" (neat with B&W photo, think "Sin City" for a camera)) this is the camera you want.Mindless, stunning, professional results.You really can't go wrong picking this camera.

If you want or need full manual controls on a camrea this size, check out the Casio Exilim Z750, which came in a close second.

And speaking of manual, thank you Canon, for including a compact printed manual for the SD500.I've become tired of having to print manuals out on my computer for many new products.

4-0 out of 5 stars Small camera great pictures
I read reviews before buying this camera.The reviews really helped my decision on the purchase.So, I guess I appreciate my reads by contributing my part.

My take on this small beauty:

Good:
* great resolution
* great colors
* really like the my color and color swaps capabilities
* small & sleek design (It fits in my tiny purse with the camera bag)
* video with zooming function
* decent battery life (get a generic brand that gives 20% more)
* underwater photography capability WITH its underwater housing case (sold separately).This is great for trips to the beach, snorkeling, and (not so deep water)diving.

Bad:
* Because it is so small and heavy with its metallic body, it's easy to drop and have bad impact on the camera body.I dropped mine to the ceramic tile floor.The point of impact was the corner of the battery compartment.I force-open the battery cover (kissed my warranty good bye) with a thin piece of metal because I didn't want to send it to the service center - I was afraid to lose my pictures in the card!
* Camera shake due to its small body.Canon should have done better to fix this.
* Pricey
* SD card comes with the camera is TOO low on capacity
* No direct in camera link to power chord.You need to buy separate AC adaptor kit which costs you some bucks.
* whining sound on video playback


Every camera has its pros and cons.SD500 is worth the money for me.

5-0 out of 5 stars Hindsight is always 20/20 - Made the right decision up front
Before I took the family on a Disney Cruise to the Carribean, I shopped for a digital camera.I spent many nights reading reviews from various sites, compared prices vs features, size, megapix, accessory cost, memory card price,etc.I narrowed it down to a Sony Cybershot vs the Canon.I can say that I am not a pro photographer in any sense, but I enjoy snapping "tourist" photos and ones of the family so one day when I am senile I will remember.THIS CAMERA TOOK FANTASTIC PHOTOS, FOOEY ON THE NAYSAYERS.The only reason their pictures turned out blurry is because they cant hold their hands still!

WHY I'M GLAD I DIDNT BUY THE SONY:
Sony memory cards are a rip off (try pricing their high-speed ones versus regular SD high speed), their spare batts are a cha-ching, and their fragile LCD's are complained about a lot.Even though the Canon camera itself costs more than the Sony camera did, the Sony accessories would have cost me more than a fully loaded Canon w/ accessories! I'm sure the photos would have been nice also, but the features on the Canon are better and I have a higher megapizel camera for an overall cheaper cost of ownership.

CANON'S COOL FEATURES!
1.Besides taking gorgeous, rich, color photos, I spent a few minutes reading the manual.If you set it to SCN scene mode, there are a ton of pre-programmed modes that compensate for every setting, beach, night, indoor, close-up plants, and even fireworks.I played with the various modes and I easily figured out which was best for the picture about to take. The Disney cruise ship did fireworks from it and the pix are awesome.Cant wait until the 4th of July!
2.Super fast 1 second, ready to shoot time from the pocket. Didnt miss a single action moment!
3.Photostich- allows you to take panaramic photos left, right, up and down, then the included software automatically pastes the pictures together!It rocks!
4.Battery life was fantastic.I wasted my money on the spare battery (which was a generic Digipower from Best Buy and it died after 20 shots!) I used the camera all day, took photos and motion video and used up the 1gb storage space and the battery never died that day.
5.I bought a 1GB high-speed SD card for it from Fry's and I took motion videos with this camera!They play back in Windows media player and I emailed those out; people thought it was from a camcorder!I owned a Panasonic D-Snap and promptly sold it after my trip to Australia last fall.Wish I took the Canon there instead!Make sure you buy the high speed SD cards not a super Sunday sale cheap 512 card for $59!A 1gb high speed is about $80-$100.Also, dont forget to do a low level format 1st!
6.Their included software is a little cumbersome to learn, but it works well once figured out.Just wish it had more editing features in it instead of having to use an external software for advanced editing.
7.LCD can be seen at 50% level even in full sunlight & zoom was decent for a compact dig cam.

CONS (IF ANY)
I dont really have any true complaints, but to be fair here are some.Why pack a 32mb SD card?That's worthless, it holds like 7 pictures, Canon ditch it and lower the price instead!Dont like the flappy door thing covering the USB jack, seems cheesy. Camera can get slippery, use the hand strap at all times, thats cheap insurance!

Hope this review helps, I know I appreciate the other reviews people posted here, it helped me make the right decision for an investment that costs over $700 with all the accessories.

2-0 out of 5 stars Dissapointed in audio recording quality, but otherwise nice.
I am/was a huge fan of the Canon powershot cameras, I started out with the 2 megapixel S110 then upgraded to a Canon S230.

1. First, the SD500 takes great photographs, that is not my complaint.

2.I purchased this camera for its video capabilities because it can record 30 frame per second video at 640x480 resolution (regular television standard).

I had fell in love with the S110 and S230 despite the limited amount of time you could do 640x480 clips for the amount of time supported by the card you are using until it fills up versus only 30 seconds with the S230.

The audio recording quality of the S230 is actually pretty good, in fact good enough that I was able to use the camera to record concerts (mainly organ/classical music concerts for friends who were playing etc, which is really neat from such a small camera.

>>>>
However the audio recording quality of the SD500 is nothing like the S230, in fact it sounds like someone took the camera and threw it in a well somewhere near what you are trying to record.It is muddy and just nothing in comparison to the S230.

That is my 2 cents.

Otherwise it is a great camera, but if you are doing it for audio recording I'd recommend finding another camera, I have went back to using my S230 even though it only records 30 seconds at a time, and is only 3 megapixels.

1-0 out of 5 stars LCD display is big but fragile
Think twice before buying the Canon SD 500 camera. The LCD displays are large but extremely fragile. Mine was cracked on the second day. It was NOT dropped or abused.

I also have a Canon S110 and have taken just over 5,000 photos with it since Christmas 2001 without any problems. Apparently, in an attempt to make the new models light and the displays large, Canon sacrificed durability.

In some cases Canon will "waive" the LCD repair cost. In others they demand $165 for the repair.

Canon repaired mine as a favor.And I've since purchased a 'da Protector Model 104 - LCD protector.A thin plastic shield that fits well over the LCD window and is stiff enough to shield the LCD from any contact. ... Read more


42. Canon 10x30 Image Stabilization Binoculars with Case, Neck Strap & Batteries
list price: $640.00
our price: Too low to display
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00004THDC
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Canon
Sales Rank: 131
Average Customer Review: 4.63 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com Product Description

Whether you are sitting in the nose-bleeder seats of a stadium or an opera house, with Canon's 10x30 IS binoculars you'll get an outstanding close-up view of the action. The binoculars are designed to fit perfectly in your hands and have a rubber coating for nonslip grip and protection from damage. The focus dial is center-mounted and the image stabilizer controls are easily accessible from either hand. Canon's optical image stabilization technology eliminates shake and reduces curvature of field. The image stabilizer operates with two AA batteries. A BP-B1 battery pack is included. The lenses are coated with Super Spectra multicoating that improves image quality by maximizing contrast and minimizing color smear.

Image Stabilization and More
A tripod is unsuitable when your subject is moving on its own. You need the ability to follow your subject under a variety of outdoor conditions, and Canon's IS technology makes tracking and keeping your outdoor subjects in view easy. Canon has taken its renowned Image Stabilizer technology from its high-performance camcorder family and adapted it for its IS binoculars as well. The Image Stabilizer system features a Vari-Angle Prism (VAP) that instantly and precisely adjusts the visual path through the binoculars to maintain a perfectly steady image. Whether you are on a moving boat chasing a school of fish, walking through the forest tracking a pair of deer, or trying to follow a fast-moving sailboat race, simply switching on Canon's Image Stabilizer gets you the sharp, clear and steady images you are after.

The VAP Image Stabilization System is available in Canon binoculars with 8x, 10x, 12x, 15x and 18x magnification. Two sensors detect vertical and horizontal motion, and a microprocessor adjusts the Vari-Angle Prisms in the right and left telescopes. Each prism is expanded in a bellows motions to instantly adjust the refraction angle of the image. The result is high-magnification and a clear, steady image at the push of a button, without the need for any additional equipment, such as a tripod. Now, you are free to follow your always on the move, outdoor subjects regardless of the conditions you are faced with.

Super Spectra Coating
A number of optical factors affect the brightness of an image, including the amount of incidental light that is reflected by the lens. An uncoated lens will refelect away as much as 8% of the incidentail light, significantly dimming the image. Canon's Super Spectra Coating prevents that reflection.

What do the numbers mean?
15x50? 8x25? The two numbers used to describe any pair of binoculars are their magnification — 8x, 12x, 15x and so on — and the diameter of their objective lenses — 25mm, 36mm, 50mm, and so on. The larger the first number is, the larger the object will appear to be in the objective lens. For instance, if you use a 10x lens and look at an object that is 100 yards away, it appears to be the same size as an object located just 10 yards away. The second number, the size of the objective lens, is important because the larger the objective lens, the more light it can admit for brighter, more detailed images, and the better suited they will be for lowlight situations.

A look inside

... Read more

Features

  • 10x magnification in a compact design
  • Built-in optical image stabilization uses 2 AA batteries
  • Super Spectra multicoating and lead-free glass lenses
  • Long 14.5mm eye relief
  • Weighs only 21 ounces

Reviews (27)

5-0 out of 5 stars Why image stabilization is a revolution in binoculars
If you want to get a quick idea why image stabilization (IS) is the next revolution in binoculars, that's easy: take any binoculars that you can get and look through them at some object (a printed page of paper with several font sizes is ideal). Then look again at the same object from the same distance, but this time with the binoculars moudnted on a steady support (don't touch em!). You will notice that the actual resolution increases by a factor of at least 2 or 3 when mounted. That is, you can discern details that are at least two or three times smaller, because mounting eliminates the smear caused by the shaking of your hands. IS is like having this support available any time and anywhere you need it by a push of a button! In most conditions, the practical resolutions I can get with my Canon IS cannot be matched by any hand-held, unstabilized binoculars in the market, including those fancy Nikons, Swarovskis, Leicas and Zeiss that cost three or four times as much. No matter how good (and how expensive) is the optics of these top-of-the-line binoculars, their limiting factor in the field is the shaking of your hands. You may have heard that IS is important because it eliminates eyestrain and headaches, or because you can use the binoculars from a boat or a moving car. While these are good reasons to buy the Canon, the best reason is that they let you see much more detail in any given distance. And this is the reason why you buy binoculars in the first place.

If you are a birder like me, and you are looking for a top of the line binoculars, do not buy anything before you try this one. In my opinion IS is going to revolutionize the whole field, so a costly pair of Swarovski or Zeiss, that normally could be considered as a good investment for life, will not be top of the line anymore in two or three years. In addition to the IS, the Canon has quite good optics, good field of view and is much smaller and lighter then most models you probably considered. This makes the Canon very close to the ideal birding binoculars: Highest resolution, less weight, and less money. I did not have the opportunity to test the larger Canon IS models, but I don't think I'd buy them even if I had the money, because they are twice as heavy and (very important for birding) has smaller field of view.

Note one general disadvantage of the Canon, however: They are not as tough as the top roof prism binoculars. They are water resistant but not water proof, and the IS requires batteries (a pair of NiMH for several hours of birding. This is the digital camera procedure: get a charger and at least one replacement set). While the binoculars feel sturdy, dropping them is not good for the IS mechanism, and this is probably why Canon gives only one year warranty. So the Canon are not the best pair to take for an expedition in Alaska, but for a Sunday birder like me, these are easily the best in their price range, and probably the best in any price.

5-0 out of 5 stars A real surprise
I've been a binocular junkie for years. I've specialized in high end glasses, particularly Leitz, Swarovski and Hensoldt (when I could get them). Two years ago, in anticipation of a trip to Kenya where I would spend the days in a moving LandRover, I thought I'd try the (then new) Cannon 10x30 Image Stabilizers. I was just blown away! The optics are excellent and the weight is surprisingly light. But the image stabilizing feature is just fabulous. There is simply no wiggle when holding these binoculars (and I'm a big coffee drinker). While they won't compensate for big rolls, jumps and twists in a moving car, they eliminate all the vibration and result in much less eye fatigue. In my opinion, it's a case of technology having obsoleted a very fine product. Take my word, do not spend over $500 for fixed binoculars without first trying the image stabilized Cannons. It's a revelation.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellence in Action
I had my eye on these binoculars for months now. When I saw them on sale at Amazon, I jumped. Amazon was only about $150.00 cheaper than a store I was planning to buy at. When they came, I couldn't believe how well the Image Stabilizer works. I remember my Dad's Binoculars as a kid. Man! Did the image look shakey! With Canon's I.S. technology, with a push of a well located button, the image stabilizes perfectly! These are great for watching wild life, birds, boats or in your neighbor's window (just kidding). I like them so much, I am saving up money now to buy the next higher up magnification for more intense bird wathcing at greater distances. I would highly recommend these sturdy, well engineered binoculars to anyone. They are EASILY worth every penny.

5-0 out of 5 stars 3 Year Warranty
I just received my 10x30IS, my first pair of high quality, made in Japan binoculars, and found out about the 3 year warranty provided by Canon USA. I bought it thinking it had just 1 year. This makes for a very sound investment in a marvelous technology.

It works great on regular AA rechargeables. No expensive proprietary li-ion packs or hard-to-find batteries to deal with here.

2-0 out of 5 stars Binoculars nice - Canon service and case not so good
Got these binoculars for my wife at Christmas this year so they are about 3 months old. We went on around 5 short hikes when the stitching binding the strap to the case came completely out of one side dropping the case to the ground. I emailed Canon expecting an apology and a new case. I got the apology, but it was with an explanation that the cases have NO warranty and I was out of luck. After spending over $300 on this product by a well-known company with a high reputation and owning it only 3 months, I expected better. The binoculars are nice, but what happens when the strap on your unwarranted case breaks, drops and breaks your binoculars, and you call Canon? Very poor quality cases. Right now I cannot use the binoculars because I have no case and have to figure something else out. So what good are great binoculars you cannot use?

Binoculars - 5 stars; Case - 0 stars; Canon - 1 star ... Read more


43. Canon PIXMA MP750 All-in-One Photo Printer
list price: $249.99
our price: $225.14
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B000650R0M
Catlog: CE
Manufacturer: Canon Computer Systems, Inc. (CCSI)
Sales Rank: 4072
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Features

  • Up to 4,800 x 1,200 color dpi resolution
  • Print and copy speeds up to 25 ppm black, 17 ppm color
  • 35-page auto document feeder, dual paper path, built-in 2-sided printing
  • 48-bit color scan depth
  • USB 2.0 interface, PictBridge-compatible direct photo printing

44. Canon Faxphone L80 Laser Fax Printer
list price: $495.00
our price: $209.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0001KWE0S
Catlog: CE
Manufacturer: Canon Office Products
Sales Rank: 5275
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Features

  • 600 x 600 dpi resolution, laser printing and faxing
  • 6 pages per minute print speed
  • 30-sheet automatic document feeder
  • 33.6 Kbps modem speed, up to 3 seconds per page
  • USB interface; 1-year warranty with exchange

Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Great little machine
I've owned the Canon L80 for about a month now. I find it to be a great laser fax machine, and it also doubles as a fine copier for small jobs when collating and a flatbed copier are not needed. For my small office needs, this Canon works perfectly for me. ... Read more


45. Canon Optura Xi MiniDV Camcorder w/11x Optical Zoom
list price: $1,699.99
our price: Too low to display
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0000BUTU9
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Canon Video
Sales Rank: 523
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Features

  • MiniDV camcorder and still camera with 2.0-megapixel CCD
  • 11x optical zoom lens (digital zoom to 220x) and image stabilizer
  • 3.5-inch LCD with 180-degree rotation
  • Make MPEG-4 movies and send them straight to your computer
  • Record for up to 110 minutes on one battery charge

Reviews (5)

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1-0 out of 5 stars Looking for camrecorder with transfering tape to tape or DVD
i'm looking for a MiniDV camrecorder that will be able to tranfer video to tape or DVD and bilt-in camera still, if anyone know ,please give me an advice

5-0 out of 5 stars Love this Camcorder
Purchased this Camcorder in January 2003. Did lots of research on comparable Panasonic and Sony models - was totally confused, finally went with the Optura Xi. Am very very happy - yes, it is bigger than the very small models. But I find it very comfortable to work with. The optical stabilizer is great - even video from a moving boat looks good. Another surprise - even though they say you won't use the still camera much on a video camcorder - I found myself using it all the time, so I was happy I had the 2 megapixels on the Optura. Not as high quality as my digital still camera - but great for web and viewing on the laptop screen. As a recent switcher from PCs to Mac - I have also been delighted with the ease of connectivity and use with my new PowerBook.

4-0 out of 5 stars A good camera
First the caveats. This is my first camcorder (after my family's circa 1980's VHS camcorder), and I've had it for a week. I also seriously considered the panasonic pvdv953, but decided on the Optura Xi because of perceived improvement in low light conditions, known Macintosh friendliness of Canon products, and hot accessory shoe. Though the Panasonic may have an edge in color reproduction, to my untrained eye the differences are arguably unnoticable.

First this camera isn't the smallest, but it fits comfortable in my hand and the 3.5" LCD is nice. The zoom slider is easy to control, and most of the camera's functionality is easy to learn. The "special" effects are cheesy and awkward to use. Luckily if you have good video editing software (e.g., iMovie) you don't need these. Optical stabilization works well, and it takes decent photos (the 8MB SD card supplied with camera is practically useless due to its size). USB and fireware connectivity are plug and play, and work as advertised (on G4 laptop).

"Low light" filming seems to be something that's continually revisited. What the heck does 1.5 lux mean anyhow? One 60 watt light? Shaded, bare, or broken and a lit candle in the corner? This camera works decently with sufficient indoor lighting (think two 60 watt in overhead frosted fixture). The low light modes are useless unless you hold the camera perfectly still. Since the white LED is underneath the lens to the right, the ultra low light mode casts a dark moon across the upper left of the video frame.

When played back on my computer or on the TV, the video images look crisp and the colors vibrant. Overall I'm very satisfied with this camera.

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful performer in its price range.
After considerable research, comparing this unit to the similarly priced Sony TRV70/TRV80, and the 3CCD Panasonic PV-DV953, I opted for the Canon Optura Xi. I wanted a digital camcorder:

1. That was compact enough to "take it along" without it being a hinderance
2. That had acceptable low-light performance (by low-light I mean average lighting indoors after dark)
3. Had a decent 16:9 widescreen mode (using the entire CCD)
4. Had a decent interface (easy to use with good stabilization)
5. No proprietary parts unless there's a darn good reason

Initially I looked at the ultra-compact models, but their unattractive low-light abilities combined with the difficult ease-of-use (hard to keep stable, many buttons on a small area) made me change my mind towards these models.

For #1, the panasonic was the largest and heaviest of the three (almost too big for me), the sony the smallest and nicely designed. Since the Optura XI just came out, I never had an opportunity to hold it, but was pleased to see that it's compact enough for my purposes.

For #2, the Panasonic did not have acceptable low-light performance for indoor home use. Its 3CCDs give it the best color representation of the three by far, however it needs a considerable amount of light to make a difference - better suited to budget-minded professionals who ensure their subjects have enough light. Sony's low light performance was only marginally better than the Panasonic's. The Canon's low light performance is top-notch.

For #3, the sony has a 'wide CCD' which allows for more pixels width-wise which was a nice bonus. The Canon and the Panasonic both use an 'anamorphic' lens that widens the camera's view and forces the widened image onto the 4:3 CCD, which can be later be burned onto a DVD as 16:9 that plays widescreen on widescreen TVs, and letterbox on 4:3 TVs. So all three had good 16:9 modes, with the Sony having a slight edge - and the bonus of presenting the image on the viewscreen as 16:9 as well!

For #4, the Sony loses in my estimation - the fact that I have to use the touchscreen during a shoot to change a picture aspect was a big downfall here. Using a touchscreen during playback is nice, but I don't want to have to use it during shooting and risk camera shake or losing my subject! Also, I have heard many criticisms about Sony's too-sensitive zoom feature. The Panasonic has great ease-of-use, however I found the myriad of manual options a little intimidating - a big plus for professionals, though. The Canon has a wonderful look and feel, it's easy to hold, all its buttons are easily accessible, and its optical image stabilization is the best you can find.

For #5, too bad for Sony, I do not want to have to buy memory sticks. Period. The nice thing about having SD cards around, for example, is the ability to transfer them to your PDA, or your digital camera if needed.

If still photos are important for you, all three provide equally nice stills, with an edge in favor of the Panasonic. ... Read more


46. Canon 18x50 Image Stabilization All Weather Binoculars with Case, Neck Strap & Batteries
list price: $2,000.00
our price: Too low to display
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00004THDE
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Canon
Sales Rank: 1548
Average Customer Review: 4.65 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com Product Description

Canon's 18x50 IS binoculars incorporate an optical image stabilizer for shake-free viewing and minimal eye fatigue. This technology was first developed for Canon video camcorders and is now available in many of Canon's binoculars. The system employs a Vari-Angle Prism, dual transparent plates, independent vertical and horizontal sensors, and a dedicated microprocessor to continuously adjust the prism to maintain a steady image.

The 18x50 IS binoculars feature a water-resistant, shock-resistant rubber coating for a nonslip grip and better durability. If you get caught in the rain and still want to view, you don't have to worry about the optics fogging up. These binoculars deliver high magnification and wide-field viewing. Controls for focusing and image stabilization are centrally located and accessible by both hands. These binoculars provide long eye relief for extra comfort.

Image Stabilization and More
With any high magnification binoculars, most users will experience frustrating image shake. Unless fixed to a tripod, image shake can render high magnification binoculars useless. Canon's IS technology is remarkably effective at eliminating this problem and is widely used by the television industry with Canon's professional broadcast quality video recording equipment. A special VAP (Vari-Angle Prism) corrective IS system sits between the objective lens group and the porro prism on each side of the binoculars. Within thousandths of a second of the binoculars being moved from their optical axis by vibrations, a detection system activates the IS mechanism. The VAP shape alters to refract or 'bend' the light path by precisely the right amount, thus fully compensating for the vibration. It is this essentially immediate response that effectively suppresses image shake.

Super Spectra Coating
A number of optical factors affect the brightness of an image, including the amount of incidental light that is reflected by the lens. An uncoated lens will refelect away as much as 8% of the incidentail light, significantly dimming the image. Canon's Super Spectra Coating prevents that reflection.

What do the numbers mean?
15x50? 8x25? The two numbers used to describe any pair of binoculars are their magnification — 8x, 12x, 15x and so on — and the diameter of their objective lenses — 25mm, 36mm, 50mm, and so on. The larger the first number is, the larger the object will appear to be in the objective lens. For instance, if you use a 10x lens and look at an object that is 100 yards away, it appears to be the same size as an object located just 10 yards away. The second number, the size of the objective lens, is important because the larger the objective lens, the more light it can admit for brighter, more detailed images, and the better suited they will be for lowlight situations.

A look inside

... Read more

Features

  • 18x magnification
  • Built-in optical image stabilization uses 2 AA batteries
  • Wide, extra-bright field of view
  • Lenses are multicoated for contrast, clarity, and color fidelity
  • Shock- and water-resistant

Reviews (17)

5-0 out of 5 stars Almost a hand-held telescope
One of my co-workers got a pair of these from Amazon today. Wow! We stood at the window of our 24th floor office and read the menu of a hot-dog cart on a corner a block and a half away.

What really clinches it (and made it possible to read the hot-dog cart menu) is the image stabilization. If you have a high magnification, any minor shake of your hand is magnified. Try it with a video camera with one of thos high digital zooms. When you're at 100x, even the electronic image stabilization can't compensate just for the average minor muscle twitches in your hand.

The image stabilization on this is optical (i.e. analog), not digital, meaning there's no fuzzing of the image as a processor tries to adjust the image to compensate for vibration. Optical zoom and optical stabilization require more expensive mechanical components to implement, thus you'll see mid-range video cameras offering their digital counterparts to enhance or substitute for optical zooms and stabilizers.

Given, these binoculars will set you back a pretty penny, but you could go to a ball game, sit in the nosebleeds and count the laces on the ball. Definitely a very cool thing for the gadget-oriented.

5-0 out of 5 stars ... some additional comments
A few additional points after using the Canon 18x50 image stabilisers on an extended holiday ... frankly, nothing beats these binoculars for bird watching or while using binoculars from a moving platform. I watched sea eagles in flight off the Norwegan coast with a clarity of vision that made it feel like I was flying in formation with them. But be warned ... carry a large stock of batteries. The Canon stabilisation system will chew through a pair of batteries in a day's steady use. Of course the binoculars still functions without image stabilisation, but once you have used the I.S. anything else seems vastly inferior. As my earlier review noted the Zeiss image stabilisation system does not use batteries, but the 3000 pound sterling cost is still prohibitive.

4-0 out of 5 stars An Interesting High-Tech Toy
I bought the Canon 18x image stabilizer binoculars a month ago and I love them.

The reason I bought these high-powered binoculars is I want to identify all the major landmarks in the San Jose South Bay area. My wife and I ride up to the mid-hill of Mt. Hamilton once a month. Most of the time before we are ready to turn back and coast down the hill, we spend a fair amount of time looking at the spectacular scenery of the San Jose and South Bay area. We want to identify as many landmarks as possible. With our compact Minolta 10x binoculars, we get a clear look at downtown San Jose and of course the Lockheed aircraft hangers. But we could not find the San Jose airport. With the new Canon binoculars, we can identify the airport and many other places. We can even find the street intersection that is only one street away from where we live. The interesting thing is once we identify a place, we can also use the compact Minolta to see the landmark, although with smaller vision. These Canon binoculars make excellent spotter.

The image stabilizer is an interesting high-tech feature. It helps to get a clear and stable view if you press the stabilizer button. However, the binoculars weight 2.6 lbs. I am tired after holding them for two to three minutes. Last time we rode up Mt. Hamilton, we bought a regular camera tripod with us. These Canon binoculars come with a built-in screw thread that can accept a standard tripod quick-release plate. With the binoculars mounted on the tripod, we spent a good half hour looking down the beautiful landscape. The obvious question is, does the use of the tripod defeat the purpose of paying extra for the image stabilizer? How much something is worth is a very personal question. It differs from person to person. I am not going to attempt to answer this question.

We are very happy to own these binoculars. This is a very pricey toy, but we love it. I first saw the Canon 15x image stabilizer binoculars at Wolf's Camera web site and they have a price tag of around $1,200. I was shocked by the price. I told myself some day I might buy it. A year later, amazon.com was carrying this 18x version at a much lower price. I was overjoyed and broke down and bought this toy the following month.

5-0 out of 5 stars Nice Binoculars!
I really like these binoculars. Please read the other reviews to gain knowledge on the product's high points. Also note, I have not found any of the low points mentioned to be present or affect my viewing in any way.

5-0 out of 5 stars Love My Binocular!!!!!!
These are a great binocular. A little pricey, but give exceptional optics with rock solid stability for viewing. ... Read more


47. Canon Powershot SD20 5MP Ultra Compact Digital Camera (Garnet)
list price: $399.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00064OB3M
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Canon Cameras US
Sales Rank: 213
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Features

  • 5-megapixel sensor captures enough detail to create photo-quality 13x17-inch prints
  • Exclusive Canon DIGIC Image Processor and iSAPS technology allow faster processing speed, excellent image quality, and vibrant colors
  • Includes five new Scene Modes and a Print/Share button for greater ease of use
  • Intelligent orientation sensor automatically rotates images for playback
  • Four novel colors with refined surface finish are the ultimate in camera couture

48. Canon Elura 80 MiniDV Camcorder w/18x Optical Zoom
list price: $649.99
our price: Too low to display
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0007G6R4A
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Canon Video
Sales Rank: 1111
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Product Description

1.33-megapixel CCD * advanced DIGIC DV image processor * digital photo mode * photo resolution options: 1280 x 960; 640 x 480 * 2-1/2" color viewscreen * ... Read more

Features

  • Powered by NB-2LH Lithium-ion battery pack
  • Compact MiniDV camcorder with 1.33-megapixel still capability
  • 18x optical zoom and 360x digital zoom with image stabilization
  • 2.5-inch LCD screen with backlight
  • Built-in slot for SD memory cards and MultiMediaCards

Reviews (1)

4-0 out of 5 stars Decent camcorder overall
Pros
- Good video quality overall (resolution)
- Decent audio
- Decent manual controls
- Includes 16MB memory card

Cons
- Not so impressive low light performance (when compared to JVC 93US)
- Not very sleek design - old fashioned controls, lens cap and flakycontrol area caps
- Not very user-friendly menu ... Read more


49. Canon PowerShot A85 4MP Digital Camera with 3x Optical Zoom
list price: $299.99
our price: Too low to display
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0002OCF0C
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Canon Cameras US
Sales Rank: 19
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Product Description

Equipped with 9-point AiAF, a feature normally found in Canon's high-end models, that allows users to get crisp, clear images quickly, even with off-center subjects. The PowerShot A85 is compatible with a wide range of optional accessories, including supplementary wide-angle, telephoto and close-up lenses as well as dedicated waterproof housings with a depth rating of 130 feet (WP-DC30 for A85 model). The new A-Series digital cameras offer Direct Printing functionality, making it easy, quick and convenient for anyone to produce high-quality photos without the need for a computer. The Print/Share button, found on most of Canon's new PowerShot models, also speeds and simplifies printing to compatible Canon and PictBridge-enabled printers. The Print/Share feature also enables one-touch Direct Transfer to Windows XP, Me, 2000 and 98 computers, for use with image processing programs, uploading to the Internet or emailing. Once connected, the Print/Share button will light up blue, indicating that it is ready to print. For quick and easy printing of high-quality images, Canon's CP printers offer the perfect option. In just 85 seconds***, consumers have printed photos right in their hands for sharing with friends and family. New to the line of Compact Photo Printers is the ability to print on 4" x 8" paper-ideal for family holiday photos or to announce the arrival of a new baby. Other printing enhancements include An ID Photo Print feature that a ... Read more

Features

  • High-performance 4.0-megapixel digital camera with 3x optical/3.6x digital/11x combined zoom
  • 1.8-inch LCD monitor for easier image previews and reviews
  • Exclusive Canon XImage Processor and iSAPS technology for faster processing and excellent image quality
  • New Print/Share button for easy direct printing and downloads
  • 9-point AiAF with special scene modes for spectacular shots in special situations

50. Canon EOS-1D Mark II 8.2MP Digital SLR Camera (Body Only)
list price: $6,499.99
our price: Too low to display
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0001G112O
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Canon Cameras US
Sales Rank: 868
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com Product Description

Canon's EOS-1D Mark II (successor to the original EOS-1D) is the ultimate professional digital SLR. Nearly doubling its predecessor's resolution to 8.2 megapixels, it also offers an improved shooting buffer for continuous shooting 8.5 frames per second at full resolution--making it the world's fastest digital SLR (as of January, 2004). It also features a faster DIGIC II imaging engine, a rugged yet lightweight weather-resistant magnesium alloy construction, capability for custom and personal presets, and dual storage slots for CompactFlash and Secure Digital cards.

Optics and Resolution
Canon's newly developed single-plate CMOS sensor with 8-channel reading technology delivers exceptional image quality, with approximately 8.2 million effective pixels (8.5 million total pixels) and a generous 28.7 x 19.1mm image size. The sensor's 3:2 aspect ratio is the same as in 35mm cameras, and the sensor's large size realizes an effective angle of view that's just 1.3 times the focal length indicated on Canon EF lenses. It features 3504 x 2336, 3104 x 2072, 2544 x 1696, and 1728 x 1152 pixel resolution settings.

A new on-chip noise elimination circuit eradicates fixed pattern and random noise. A low-pass filter placed in front of the sensor reduces false color and moire effects, while the infrared filter suppresses red fringing caused by sensor reflections and fog.

RAW processing
New Digital Photo Professional image processing software is provided for high-speed processing of lossless RAW files. It enables real-time display and immediate application of adjustments to images and includes a wide array of RAW, TIFF, or JPEG image editing functions, which give control over variables such as white balance, dynamic range, exposure compensation and color tone. It supports sRGB, Adobe RGB, and Wide Gamut RGB color spaces.

Digic II Imaging Processor
Canon's newly developed, state-of-the-art DIGIC II imaging engine achieves super high speed processing that results in continuous shooting of 8.2-megapixel images at 8.5 fps in maximum bursts of 40 (JPEG format) or 20 (RAW format) shots. By handling larger volumes of image data, DIGIC II also contributes to lower power consumption: up to about 1,200 shots can be taken on a full battery at 20 degrees C, or around 800 shots at 0 degrees C.

More Features
The new 230,000-pixel, 2.0-inch color TFT LCD offers nearly twice the resolution of monitors on other EOS digital models, nearly 100% coverage of JPEG images, and a new bolder typeface that simplifies reading of text menus. Photos displayed on the LCD monitor can be magnified from 1.5X to 10X in 15 increments, allowing you to check the focus and exposure of images with high precision.

You can easily tailor the EOS-1D MARK II to meet your own specialized needs:

  • 21 Custom Functions with 67 settings include the removal of the ISO speed extension setting to the ISO speed extension menu, the addition of new E-TTL averaged autoflash metering, and the inclusion of AI Servo continuous shooting, which was previously a Personal Function.
  • 25 Personal Functions can be installed in the camera at any time, via driver software, to meet high-level customization needs. New features include the ability to append data for data verification and the ability to apply the Quick Control Dial's ON/OFF switch to the Main Dial to prevent accidental changes to settings when shooting remotely with EOS Capture.
Other features include:
  • Images can be recorded in the JPEG image format, the RAW image format, or both formats simultaneously.
  • Seven Color Matrix settings are provided for JPEG and RAW images, including five factory presets that were previously available and two new settings that allow independent user adjustment of color space, color saturation, and color tone within a prescribed range.
  • ISO speeds are selectable in 1/3 increments (100-1600) and may be set as low as 50 or as high as 3200 through the ISO extension menu.
  • It offers 10 selectable white balance modes and a new WB Compensation function, which allows adjustment of blue/amber and magenta/green biases in +/-9 steps, as well as combined use of light-balancing (LB) and color-correction (CC) equivalent digital color filters.
  • Canon's improved Evaluative Through-The-Lens (E-TTL) Autoflash system offers new averaged metering in addition to the evaluative metering available on other EOS models.
  • Designed as a serious tool for professionals, the EOS-1D MARK II offers rigid magnesium alloy in the chassis and external covers (top, front, rear and memory card slot cover).

Lens Compatibility
Canon's lineup of professional EF lenses--including over 50 models ranging from 14mm ultra-wide-angle to 1,200mm super-telephoto--are compatible with the new EOS-1D Mark II (except the EF-S line). Canon's sophisticated electronic lens mount technology communicates with the camera as soon as the lens is mounted to transfer information about the lens, such as its type, f-number and focal length, thus enabling faster, more precise control from the camera.

EF lenses offer professional capabilities that meet wide-ranging needs, including such features as an Ultrasonic Motor that silently drives the autofocus mechanism with very high precision, an Image Stabilizer that automatically compensates for camera shake via microcomputer, advanced aspherical optics, fluorite lenses, Ultra Low Dispersion (UD) lenses, and Super UD lenses.

Storage and Transfer
The EOS-1D Mark II offers support for both CompactFlash Type I and II (making it MicroDrive compatible) and Secure Digital (SD) memory cards. Images can be recorded on a CompactFlash card or SD memory card alone; on both cards at the same time as a safeguard against losing important data; or on both cards, one at a time, to maximize storage capacity. It connects to PCs and Macs via FireWire (also referred to as IEEE1394, or i.Link) and USB 1.1 (which activates PictBridge printing capabilities).

Power and Size
The camera is powered by a rechargeable NiMH (nickel metal hydride) battery pack (NP-E3, included); it also requires one CR2025 for date and time settings. It measures 6.1 x 6.2 x 3.1 inches and weighs 43 ounces (camera body only without batteries; battery adds 11.8 ounces).

What's in the Box
This package includes the EOS-1D Mark II digital SLR camera body, rechargeable NiMH battery (NP-E3), AC adapter (DCK-E1), CR2025 battery, and USB and FireWire (IEEE1394) cables. The CD-ROM includes EOS Viewer Utility software for faster image preview, and Digital Photo Professional software for high-speed processing and handling of RAW images. It is compatible with over 60 Canon EF lenses (excluding EF-S lens) and the entire Canon EX series Speedlite flash range. ... Read more

Features

  • 8.2-megapixel CMOS sensor--3:2 aspect ratio the same as in 35mm cameras
  • Compatible with Canon professional EF lenses (except the EF-S line)
  • Continuous shooting 8.5 frames per second at full resolution; rugged, weather-resistant magnesium alloy
  • Supports both CompactFlash Type I and II and Secure Digital (SD) memory cards
  • Powered by rechargeable NiMH battery pack; connects to PCs and Macs via FireWire and USB 1.1

51. Canon ZR300 MiniDV Camcorder w/22x Optical Zoom (High Metal)
list price: $599.99
our price: Too low to display
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0007D9C2M
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Canon USA
Sales Rank: 387
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Product Description

680,000-pixel CCD * digital photo mode * photo resolution options: 1024 x 768 (interpolated); 640 x 480 * Motion JPEG (M-JPEG) movie mode * slot for use with separate MultiMediaCard® or SD memory cards * 2-3/8" color viewscreen * color viewfinder * PCM stereo digital audio (12-bit or 16-bit) * variable-speed 22X optical zoom lens (digital zoom to 440X) * ... Read more

Features

  • 680,000-pixel CCD
  • digital photo mode
  • photo resolution options: 1024 x 768 (interpolated); 640 x 480
  • Motion JPEG (M-JPEG) movie mode
  • slot for use with separate MultiMediaCard┬« or SD memory cards

52. Canon ZR400 MiniDV Camcorder w/14x Optical Zoom (Dark Metal)
list price: $649.00
our price: Too low to display
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0007W2H4S
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Canon
Sales Rank: 734
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Product Description

Capture Brilliant Videos With DIGIC DVThe vibrant color of a summer sunset, the exhilarating action of a championship goal, and the tender moment of a newlywed kiss are all preserved in spectacular color, clarity and detail by the ZR100. Canon's most affordable, yet exceptionally powerful, digital camcorder brings together a variety of advanced features in one stylish package. Inside the streamlined body of the ZR100 is Canon's DIGIC DV system, which delivers outstanding image quality videos. With the 20x Optical Zoom/400x Digital Zoom lens, you'll also quickly appreciate why the name Canon is synonymous with professional image quality in photography and broadcast television. Another highlight of the ZR100 is its high-resolution 16:9 widescreen recording mode, which lets you capture true widescreen videos. With the ZR100 in hand, all of life's most precious moments are yours for the taking. ... Read more

Features

  • Fast and easy printing
  • From camera to computer with ease
  • Brilliant digital video and photography
  • Vivid Canon optical quality
  • The brilliance and sharpness of megapixel performance

53. Canon Powershot SD20 5MP Ultra Compact Digital Camera (Silver)
list price: $399.95
our price: $349.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00064OBL4
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Canon Cameras US
Sales Rank: 302
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Features

  • 5-megapixel sensor captures enough detail to create photo-quality 13x17-inch prints
  • Exclusive Canon DIGIC Image Processor and iSAPS technology allow faster processing speed, excellent image quality, and vibrant colors
  • Includes five new Scene Modes and a Print/Share button for greater ease of use
  • Intelligent orientation sensor automatically rotates images for playback
  • Four novel colors with refined surface finish are the ultimate in camera couture

54. Canon Powershot SD20 5MP Ultra Compact Digital Camera (Midnight Blue)
list price: $399.95
our price: Too low to display
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00064OB1E
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Canon Cameras US
Sales Rank: 153
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Features

  • 5-megapixel sensor captures enough detail to create photo-quality 13x17-inch prints
  • Exclusive Canon DIGIC Image Processor and iSAPS technology allow faster processing speed, excellent image quality, and vibrant colors
  • Includes five new Scene Modes and a Print/Share button for greater ease of use
  • Intelligent orientation sensor automatically rotates images for playback
  • Four novel colors with refined surface finish are the ultimate in camera couture

55. Canon Elura 90 MiniDV Camcorder w/20x Optical Zoom
list price: $799.00
our price: Too low to display
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0007G6QP0
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Canon Video
Sales Rank: 844
Average Customer Review: 1.0 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Product Description

1.33-megapixel CCD * advanced DIGIC DV image processor * 16:9 widescreen video mode * digital photo mode with built-in flash * photo resolution options: 1280 x 960; 640 x 480 * 2-1/2" color viewscreen * ... Read more

Features

  • Built-in slot for SD memory cards and MultiMediaCards
  • Powered by NB-2LH Lithium-ion battery pack
  • Compact MiniDV camcorder with 1.33-megapixel still capability, built-in video light, and still flash
  • 20x optical zoom and 400x digital zoom with image stabilization
  • 2.5-inch LCD screen with backlight

Reviews (1)

1-0 out of 5 stars Canon ripped me off
I am so frustrated with my Canon Elura. Apparently Canon Eluras have a structural flaw, and after a few months using it a message to eject the tape starts to pop all the time. Some people are even considering a collective lawsuit against Canon. The camera was great when it was working. But I am pretty convinced that the fate of 95% of all Canon Eluras after 6 months are the same as mine: the garbage bin. Just check all the online reviews. If you want a "perishable" good, then go ahead and buy your Elura. If you want a "durable" good, I would recommend you a Sony. Sony pioneered the mini-dv system, and Sony cameras typically last for decades. I read the bad reviews about the Canon Elura 90 and decided to spend several hundred dollars on one. I Lost my money and my camera after a few months (Canon warranty and factory service are a joke). I took my chances. Will you take yours?
... Read more


56. Casio Exilim EXZ57 5MP Digital Camera with 3x Optical Zoom
list price: $499.99
our price: Too low to display
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0007KQWD2
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Casio
Sales Rank: 420
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Product Description

The EX-Z57 EXILIM Zoom for brilliant picture viewing - The extra-large 2.7-inch liquid crystal display represents an astonishingly easy-to-view screen for brilliant picture viewing without compromising its compact?s stylish design. The EX-Z57 features a 5 megapixel CCD and an optical 3X zoom lens to take photos of remarkable picture quality. Extra-long battery life of approximately 400 shots (CIPA standards) on a single battery charge assures users that they can enjoy shooting and looking at their pictures over and over again without ever worrying about the battery life. EX-Z57 EXILIM Zoom Features High Performance Operation in an Easy-to-Use, Compact Design Equipped with a large, easy-to-view 2.7-inch digital interface TFT liquid crystal display that brings out the true brilliant quality of the pictures. High-resolution images captured by the CCD with 5 million effective pixels. Optical 3X zoom lens in a very compact design Sleek, stylish lightweight aluminum body with a comfortable grip Super Life Battery For Extended Shooting on a Single Battery charge Same battery life as the EX-Z55 - but with a larger 2.7 inch LCD - Approximately 400 shots can be taken on a single battery charge (CIPA standards). Quick Response Thanks to High-Speed Design The camera automatically selects fixed-focus Auto Pan Focus mode for instantaneous response when the shutter is depressed at one push. Direct On function for one-touch operation of either picture taking or playback modes ... Read more

Features

  • Powered by Lithium-ion rechargeable battery (included, with charger); stores images on SD cards (camera features 9.3MB of internal memory)
  • 5-megapixel CCD captures enough detail for photo-quality 13 x 17-inch prints
  • 3x optical zoom; extra-large 2.7-inch LCD display
  • Fast shutter speed--images are recorded approximately 0.01 seconds after the shutter is released
  • Approximately 400 shots per battery charge

Reviews (4)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Quality Product
I purchased this camera to replace my old and bulky Dimage S414. The dimage used to take a few snaps on a single charge. This camera has a marathon battery life. I used it for my whole graduation ceremony, and coupled with a 1GB card, it served as a great digital video camera too. The profile is slim with an excellent form factor. This does not compromise on the image quality however as it does not use the new type lenses like the Canon T33, T1. (The technology is beta).
Finally, the LCD truly makes the viewfinder obsolete.
A camera from Casio thats better than anything from anybrand short of a digital SLR.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great camera, loaded with features
Despite reading positive reviews, I initially hesitated before buying this little camera -- I wasn't sure how a Casio would stack up against brands like Canon and Nikon. But a local shop strongly recommended this model, and I decided to give it a try. I'm glad to say that I've been very pleasantly surprised by the EX-Z57's excellent performance and features.

The reason I was buying a new digital P&S in the first place was that my old Nikon Coolpix (a 775) was really, really slow; I missed way too many perfect moments or expressions waiting for that thing to actually take a picture. (In all other respects, I love the Nikon.) My other camera -- a Canon Digital Rebel -- is absolutely awesome, but it's too big and heavy to take with you without a definite reason. For day-to-day shooting around town, I wanted something we could toss into a pocket or bag. (The best way to take good photos is to actually have a camera with you when the opportunity comes up!!!)

So I was looking for a fast, small, high-quality camera. The Casio is fast -- very fast -- when starting up, shooting, and displaying images or menus. The size is perfect. And the quality of the images and performance has been very high.

While researching the Casio, I wondered about the lack of a viewfinder. Again, I've been pleased. The huge LCD is entirely sufficient for shooting pictures -- I haven't missed the viewfinder at all -- and it's great to have such a large screen to work with when you're scrolling through the various features. For example, if you want to check out the "best shot" pre-set modes, you can scroll through screens that have a title, a sample photo, and a one-sentence description of the settings/purpose. It's a lot of useful information that you simply can't display on cameras with standard screens.

The menu and controls are inuitive and easy to learn. The manual provides next to no information, but once you know what the features are -- the Casio site describes them in detail -- it's easy to become proficient.

The image quality has been great -- even for indoor photos. The "docking station" is cool, too -- you can simultaneously charge the battery and transfer images.

So while we've only had this for a few weeks, we've already taken a few hundred photos, and we're really pleased with this little camera. It's loaded with features, easy to use, and seemingly very well made. With the 5 megapixel capacity, I think it's a great buy, especially compared to comparable big-name brands.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great product
I purchased the EXZ57 and found it to be excellent. The large digital viewer is fantastic and the overall functions is easy to use. The long life battery is a plus and the picture quality is perfect. Highly recommend!

5-0 out of 5 stars Largest LCD in a digicam, but no more optical viewfinder
My local camera store just got their first shipment of Casio's new Exilim EX-Z57 super-slim digital camera, and I eagerly hopped over to check it out.

The EX-Z57 is a very slight upgrade (and one downgrade... read on) of the very popular EX-Z55 model.The Z55 had a 2.5" LCD screen that was considered "huge" just a year ago, but now that so many other digital cameras also sport a 2.5" LCD, Casio decided to release a 2.7" LCD model, hence the Z57.Amazingly, the overall physical size hasn't changed, and the EX-Z55's industry-leading amazing battery life (over 300 even with flash on and LCD on full-time) has been retained, making the EX-Z57 another battery life champ.

As far as I can tell -- and from what the sales clerk told me -- the internals of the EX-Z57 are identical to those of its immediate predecessor.This means very good image quality from such a small camera.Three important issues to keep in mind as you shop for this camera or a similarly ultracompact model:

1. The tiny lens and tiny sensor necessarily limit the sharpness of the picture.If you shoot at the maximum 5MP and print out at up to 5x7", you probably won't be disappointed by the sharpness of the picture.However, as you print larger pictures, you'll see the pictures tend to be softer and noisier than from larger cameras.This is simply a result of the law of physics, and it's a trade-off between size and quality.

2. The small camera also means a small, limited-power flash, so your indoor pictures when the ambient lighting is dim will not come out very satisfactory.Again, this is entirely due to the small form factor.If you want to use this camera to shoot a small group of friends at a dinner party, it's okay.But you should know that as you near the flash range and go beyond, you'll get horrible-looking pictures.

3. A camera this small makes it very hard to hold it steady.Many people with tiny cameras like this complain about blurry pictures.This is because as you press the shutter button, you'll move the camera ever so slightly.With a larger camera body (e.g., a digital SLR), the much heavier camera body requires more effort to hold which has the side benefit of providing a counteracting force to the shutter-pushing force.Hence, with a small camera like the EX-Z57, you must remember to hold the camera very steady as you press the shutter.

Whereas the older EX-Z55 had an optical viewfinder, Casio opted to remove it in order to accommodate the enlarged LCD screen without changing the overall size of the camera.Yes, the Z55's optical viewfinder was tiny and hard to use, but at least it was an option -- and looking through the optical viewfinder instead of at the screen actually helps steady your shots because you hold the camera close to your body (think the principle of leverage).Also, when you are really low on battery, switching to optical viewfinder can squeeze out a few more shots.For a camera purish like myself, it's a pity that the optical viewfinder is no more on the Z57, but for most casual photographers (the Exilim's target audience) this will likely be a non-issue, since they probably would never use the optical vewfinder to begin with.

In summary, the Z57 provides an unbeatable small form factor yet a crowd-pleasing huge LCD screen, amazing battery life and very good image quality (for a camera this size).You can also record movies (albeit only at a stuttering 15 frames per second) as well as sound.It's very intuitive to use, and my friends who have the Z55 are all very happy with it (once I gave them the tip about holding the camera super-steady or on a tripod to avoid blurs).While I don't have money to buy another digital camera at the moment, but if I had some extra spare dough, I would definitely buy this just for the HUGE 2.7" LCD.To a gadget freak like me, it's priceless to be able to impress my friends with something this cool.:) ... Read more


57. Canon CanoScan LiDE 500F Color Image Scanner
list price: $129.99
our price: $129.19
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0002OG6JI
Catlog: CE
Manufacturer: Canon Computer Systems, Inc. (CCSI)
Sales Rank: 3380
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Product Description

The CanoScan LiDE 500F Color Image Scanner combines sleek styling with heavyweight performance. One convenient cable provides both power and a USB connection, reducing the number of wires around your desk. A USB Hi-Speed interface* enables incredibly fast image transfers to your computer, along with the fastest possible scanning speeds. Previews of your scans are ready in seconds. For added convenience, four easy buttons - Copy, Scan, PDF and E-Mail automate the scanning process, so your projects can get done more quickly. Just position your original, select the use for the image and in seconds it's ready to go.You're going to love the results. The LiDE 500F scanner delivers a maximum 2400 x 4800 color dpi resolution and 48-bit color depth, for over 281 trillion possible colors. The unique Doubled-Hinge expansion top lifts approx. 1 inch vertically and lays flat on the page to help ensure clear, sharp scans with minimal light distortion.Here's a simple solution for all those old negatives you've got sitting in boxes, just place them in the LiDE 500F's film adapter and press the Scan button! These valuable images can be archived on your computer, safe from heat, humidity and dust, and then printed for family and friends. FARE (Film AutomaticRetouching and Enhancement) Level 3 is a built-in film retouching technology that automatically removes much of the dust and scratches that may appear on your originals. The result? The final scans of dusty and scratche ... Read more

Features

  • USB interface; PC and Mac compatible
  • 4,800 x 2,400 dpi optical resolution, 19,200 dpi interpolated
  • 48-bit color depth, 16-bit grayscale
  • Double-hinge expansion top for scanning bulky items
  • Scans negatives and positives with included film adapter

Reviews (5)

2-0 out of 5 stars This was a bit of a let down
Scans photographs OK, but there are blurry areas on other images, around the edges. I've been using scanners for many years, was tempted by the slim design...just didn't work out.

5-0 out of 5 stars The best portable scanner available today
I looked hard at the Canon Canoscan LiDE 20 through LiDE 80 series and found much to admire. Even though I am a committed buyer of older-and-proven tech products, I paid a bit extra to get the newer Canon LiDE 500F. Why? Great design, great portability, great scanning resolution, great software - all for a great price. The LiDE 80 has these too, but the latest evolution of the Canon LiDE concept embodied in the 500F goes much further.

I'm a freelance writer, and I needed a slim and portable platen-based scanner powered through a fast USB 2.0 port to avoid a separate power supply for the scanner. I have a sheet-fed scanner built into my trusty old HP OfficeJet T45, but it's only good for documents neatly printed by PC printers, not odd-sized info from books and magazines that require a platen-based scanner. I use the Canoscan LiDE 500F to "copy" info when gathering research, both with my office desktop PC and in remote locations with my laptop. I use ABBYY FineReader 7.0 optical character recognition to recreate the original document or article's text (complete with the original graphics and layout) saved in Microsoft Word. The offsite alternative to this is a crude, time consuming, and expensive hassle using a local library copier.

The LiDE 500F's double-hinge expansion top design enables the platen lid to fold away flat, so any book or magazine covers the platen for scanning without having to deal with the platen lid at all. The Canon software is quite comprehensive, covering the gamut of customized scanning needs from simple office automation to highly complex scans for graphics. A built-in stand enables the LiDE 500F to stand on its edge in the office, enabling space-saving efficiency and convenience, with it's software-automated buttons for "copying" to a printer, scanning to a bitmap file, scanning to an Adobe PDF file, and inserted a saved scan into an email as an attachment. You will especially love the one-step convenience of inserting a bill or invoice into the scanner while mounted on its edge, and having the scanned item automatically print directly to whatever default printer you preselect. The software also well supports the external film/slide adapter up to the 48-bit 2400x4800 max - including the vaunted FARE Level 3 (Film Automatic Retouching and Enhancement) built-in film retouching technology that automatically removes much of the dust and scratches that may appear on your originals. Canon's FARE Level 3 works, and works quite well to my eyes.

Is this the ideal scanner for the graphic artist or photography enthusiast? No. Desktop-only scanners dedicated to these pursuits are far superior in every way, only lacking the portability and all-round usefulness that the LiDE 500F offers for the price. The LiDE 500F reminds me of why the Olympus DS-330 is such a great voice recorder for both workstation-docked recording of telephone interviews and on-location voice recordings: a combination of great design for both stationary use and mobile use, and great software that handles every contingency for both the professional writer or general corporate user.

Drawbacks? The LiDE 500F is larger than the LiDE 20-80 series, a bit heavier, and a bit thicker. Note that it is almost exactly the same size as an Apple 17" Powerbook, so an Apple neoprene laptop sleeve for that PC fits it perfectly for slipping into your briefcase (if your briefcase is large enough). Just make sure you lock the platen down with the switch on the back before moving it to avoid damage. I've heard that the LiDE 500F is "noisy." It's not, really - no more than any other scanner. Just a low hum when scanning that disturbs nobody in today's noisy libraries, and virtually unnoticeable in any corporate office. I read somewhere that it is "slow." All scanners are slow compared to a high-speed copier, but the LiDE 500F's USB 2.0 interface boosts its performance considerably compared to the earlier LiDE 20/30/35 models that use a slower USB 1.1 interface. The speed of the LiDE 80 should be about the same, as it also uses a USB 2.0 interface. The trick to fast scanning is to limit your scanned resolutions to 300dpi or less. The file sizes will be smaller, and there's less work for your PC to handle for each scan.

If the LiDE 500F is too pricey or fancy for your needs, be aware that refurbished LiDE 20's and LiDE 35's are available today (April/2005) for a song - $30-$50! But they are limited by a slower USB 1.1 interface, lower resolutions for your photos, and don't have the built-in edge-standing office convenience of the LiDE 500F. Note that I have not commented on the quality of the scanning, color faithfulness, or sharpness. I also cannot comment on its long-term durability. To me, the LiDE 500F performs quite well and exhibits none of the weird patterning and faint lines that seem to plague similar slim-profile models from HP. Truth be told, HP printing and scanning products seem to have suffered from shabby quality and design in the past five years, and are no longer the unquestioned "safe bet" they once were. In contrast, the LiDE 500F certainly seems to be a safe bet for those seeking an ideal balance of performance and portability that desktop scanners have never before offered.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent performance for the price
This is the first scanner I have purchased. Setup was easy, the scanner driver software is simple to use and very helpful if you want to do multiple scans - just scan once - it sends the image to the calling application and then returns back to the scanning page. Repalce your items on the scanner and scan again for the next page - this is pretty helpful if you have to scan a lot of items. My friend has a HP scanner (6210) which does not have this feature.

My first scanner was a defective one (gave calibration errors), but Canon replaced it promptly (in 2 days).

The film adapter is also present for your 35mm scans.

Actually this is the only scanner in the market that has so many positive features

- self powered
- high optical scan resolution
- 35 mm adapter
- IR dust detection and correction (works quite well in the Medium setting)
- very sleek and small - can be easily put in a laptop bag
- has a LED based illumination system unlike other scanners - this means no need to wait for the 'warm up'

So far I haven't had a single problem. This is an excellent buy! 5 stars.

5-0 out of 5 stars What more could you want?
I am quite impressed with this scanner.My last scanner was purchased back in 1999; this new one is in a different league!Scanning is fast and easy and I'm quite surprised by the quality of the images.I've scanned 20 year-old photographs and the quality of the scans easily matches the orginal prints!

Set-up was easy with the USB cable (no power cord needed); it is lightweight with a sleek design; and the software is quite usable.I spent a few hours reading reviews on the Internet before I purchased this and I am convinced I made a good decision.You're not going to do much better in this price range!

5-0 out of 5 stars Feature rich, mobile, quality - produce good scans for the $
Summary
+ Very mobile (no power cord uses USB connection for power)
+ Good quality
+ Plenty of useful software to get you started
+ Good resolution
+ IR image correction
+ Scans negatives (a 6 frame strip at once)
+ Small footprint, and 3 ways to setup the scanner on your desk.
+ Good match with the i950 printer.
+ No waiting for warm-up, just scan away.
(...)
+ Well matched with my I950 printer

- Slower than some of the $90 bulky scanners.
- Lower resolution than some of the bulky scanners.

*************************************************************************************************************
I purchased this scanner the day it came out (Jan 31 2005).(...)

There were more features, it was a newer product.So I gambled with the 500f and returned the LiDE80.
The reviews were mixed for the LiDE 80 to begin with.It seems that it's biggest asset was the slim profile.This attribute is compounded in the 500f since it can be setup "vertically".The footprint is minimized on the desktop.

The LiDE technology allows the use of LEDs to illuminate the object being scanned.Other technology uses a cathode/fluorescent tube.The advantages of the LEDs are that there is no warm up and thus no waiting.The life span is much greater for LEDs, and they are not damaged by movement or vibration.Though most cathode/fluorescent tubes can produce just as good a sometimes much better image quality, their lifespan can be shorter and power requirements are much greater.This technology is best realized if you will be moving the scanner, using it adhoc, or if you don't want to wait for a warm-up.LiDE is also what allows Canon to make the thing so thin (1").

The 500f scanner is rather slow at higher resolutions 2-3 sec preview and 30 - 40 seconds full scan.Other tube type scanners offer higher resolution with faster scan speeds for less money.These scanners are fine if you are not interested in the space saving aspect, and don't mind an initial warm-up.

The scanner does a good job at correcting minor scratches and dust on slides and photos.I think the over all quality is fantastic, not to mention the price.

The unit operates pretty quietly and is a good match with my printer (Canon i950 - which is incredible by the way).

The software offered is complete and allows you to really use the scanner.There is a simple tool which scans and saves - a tool for photo editing (feature rich I might add)- a tool for assigning actions to the 4 buttons (mail, pdf, copy, scan).The copy is pretty cool if you want the image to scan and go right to the printer to be printed.You also get a program which scans and converts image to text.If you were to scan the pages of a book the scan would be converted to text.I have not used this text recognition software yet, but it could be useful at some point.

A nice feature of the 500f over the 80 is the fact that you can scan a 6 frame strip of negatives at once.The 80 requires you to manually advance 1 frame at a time.If you're looking to archive negatives, or perhaps make reprints of your negatives, this is a really cool feature simply made better on the 500f.Other scanners offer the 35mm negative functionality as well...

I'm very happy with the purchase of this scanner.People that may feel it is lacking is those who are not in the market for a $109 scanner.If you want a really high end scanner you're going to be paying more than 2 times that amount.However; there are some scanners for less money that produce scans just as good but lack the features.

The scanner is only going to be as good as your printer; and for what I do, its a real bargain. ... Read more


58. Canon PowerShot A400 3.2MP Digital Camera with 2.2x Optical Zoom (Blue)
list price: $199.99
our price: Too low to display
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0002OGWJC
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Canon Cameras US
Sales Rank: 123
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Features

  • New contemporary design 3.2 Megapixel digital camera with 2.2x Optical/3.2x Digital/7x Combined Zoom
  • Extraordinarily fast shutter release with the Quick Shot function
  • Canon Image Processor and iSAPS Technology for faster processing and excellent image quality
  • New print/share button for easy direct printing and downloads
  • Comes in four fun colors: Silver, Sky Blue, Lime Green, and Sunset Gold

59. Canon 15x50 Image Stabilization All Weather Binoculars with Case, Neck Strap & Batteries
list price: $1,600.00
our price: Too low to display
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00006I53P
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Canon
Sales Rank: 747
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com Product Description

With its wide 50mm objective lenses and high magnification,these rugged, all-weather Canon Image Stabilizer binoculars are destined to set a new and higher benchmark for image brightness, clarity and ergonomic design.

Leave your tripod at home when you use the new Canon 15x50 binoculars. Canon has once again made its world-renowned optical image stabilizer more convenient to use on this all-weather binocular. With a push of a button, bumpy images are stabilized instantly for maximum viewing. Multicoated ultralow dispersion (UD) objective elements add contrast, clarity, and color fidelity. Housed in a rugged, water-resistant, and slip-free rubber body, these binoculars can be used in rain or shine, whether in a football stadium or on the high seas. Stargazing is also possible with these versatile binoculars. The 15x50 is greatly improved over the previous model, with a larger 50mm objective lens, more convenient operation of the optical image stabilizer, and optional antifog eyepieces. Two AA batteries power the device. Also included in the package are a case, neck strap, and eyepiece covers.

Image Stabilization and More
With any high magnification binoculars, most users will experience frustrating image shake. Unless fixed to a tripod, image shake can render high magnification binoculars useless. Canon's IS technology is remarkably effective at eliminating this problem and is widely used by the television industry with Canon's professional broadcast quality video recording equipment. A special VAP (Vari-Angle Prism) corrective IS system sits between the objective lens group and the porro prism on each side of the binoculars. Within thousandths of a second of the binoculars being moved from their optical axis by vibrations, a detection system activates the IS mechanism. The VAP shape alters to refract or 'bend' the light path by precisely the right amount, thus fully compensating for the vibration. It is this essentially immediate response that effectively suppresses image shake.

Super Spectra Coating
A number of optical factors affect the brightness of an image, including the amount of incidental light that is reflected by the lens. An uncoated lens will refelect away as much as 8% of the incidentail light, significantly dimming the image. Canon's Super Spectra Coating prevents that reflection.

What do the numbers mean?
15x50? 8x25? The two numbers used to describe any pair of binoculars are their magnification — 8x, 12x, 15x and so on — and the diameter of their objective lenses — 25mm, 36mm, 50mm, and so on. The larger the first number is, the larger the object will appear to be in the objective lens. For instance, if you use a 10x lens and look at an object that is 100 yards away, it appears to be the same size as an object located just 10 yards away. The second number, the size of the objective lens, is important because the larger the objective lens, the more light it can admit for brighter, more detailed images, and the better suited they will be for lowlight situations.

A look inside

... Read more

Features

  • This pair of binoculars from Canon are unique among high-magnification binoculars because they incorporate Canon's remarkable Optical Image Stabilizer technology
  • The Image Stabilizer technology compensates for handshaking as well as minute vibrations at the touch of a button
  • It also features 15x zoom to accommodate wide-ranging activities
  • A 50mm objective lens for a wide, extra-bright field of view
  • Multi-Coated Ultra-Low Dispersion Objective Elements add contrast, clarity & color fidelity

Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars nothing short of spectacular
This is one of the finest optical instruments i ever bought. The Image Stabilizer works so fantastic and flawless you just don't wanna let this bino out of your hand. It even works while you watch from a driving car. You can make out license plate numbers from about 400 ft away. I also bought protective lenses which I use during daytime. When stargazing I realized some mirror effects from the protective lens - so just let those off during nightime. This is the most useful and inexpensive tool for stargazing. Even better than some telescopes for the same price. The AA at 2100 mAh last for about 3-4 hrs. Even with the IS shut off the optics are awesome - but with the IS engaged it is breathtaking. It is definitely worth to spend the extra money to get this system over any other w/o IS.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great for learning basic astronomy
I bought these binoculars (along with "The Backyard Astronomer's Guide", "Touring the Universe Through Binoculars," and Starry Night software) to learn some basic astronomy. This has turned out to be a winning combination.

While these binoculars weigh 2.6 pounds, they have a very natural, comfortable fit in the hands and are easy to handle.

The image stabilization is amazing and really improves my ability to resolve stellar objects and surface details of the moon.

It does seem a little odd that Canon did not include front lens caps. However the 15x50s are threaded for 58 mm filters, so one can easily purchase standard lens caps. I bought a pair of 58 mm Canon lens caps which fit, although the heavy rubber armor leaves minimal clearance to operate the lens cap release buttons. With filters installed the lens caps fit exactly as they would on a camera lens with plenty of clearance to remove, even if wearing gloves.

5-0 out of 5 stars Stellar Performance
These binoculars are spectacular. Point them at Jupiter and you see a bright dot wandering around in the field of view. Press the image stabilization switch and the planet and its moons instantly become visible. While they can't subtract all movement they do get rid of the little shakes that make hand held viewing so difficult. 15x is enough magnification that Saturn is obviously not round.

A complaint about earier versions of the Canon IS line was that your finger went to sleep holding the IS switch down. Now you can press it briefly to turn on the IS circuitry which will automatically shut off in 5 minutes. If you press and hold the switch it shuts off as soon as you release it.

I haven't had my pair long enough to comment on battery life but do see a problem changing them when they are mounted on a tripod. Unlike most binoculars where the tripod mounting is at the objective end where the two barrels rotate on the Canons it is at the bottom of the binocular near the center of the tubes which don't rotate. And the battery compartment is just in front of it so you can't get to it if the binoculars are on a tripod of have a quick release plate attached.

Since the lens barrels don't rotate intra-ocular distance is adjusted by actually moving the oculars. They are kind of stiff but that is good because they stay in place once you get them set.

The tripod mount is lower than the highest part of the lens barrels so if you have a big quick release plate like that of the Manfrotto (Bogen) 410 geared head (highly recommended) it presses against the bottom of the barrels and not the flat between them.

For some reason Canon doesn't seem to fell that the objective lenses need any protection as they don't ship lens covers for them. They do provide lens covers for the oculars but they pop off a lot because the eye cups are so soft. It looks like you need something like 69mm lens caps. They don't tell you in the manual but Canon sales says they are threaded to accept 58mm filters so you can buy solar filters for them.

I can use the binoculars with my glasses on due to the 15 mm eye relief but it is really easier to use them without the glasses.

They are heavy, ~2,5#, but if you support them on the heels of your hands very stable. ... Read more


60. Canon EOS 6.3MP Digital Rebel Camera (Body Only)
list price: $1,199.99
our price: Too low to display
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0000C8VU8
Catlog: Photography
Manufacturer: Canon
Sales Rank: 192
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com Product Description

The Canon EOS Digital Rebel brings advanced digital performance and SLR controls to everyday photographers. Whether you're new to digital cameras, SLR cameras, or even photography itself, you'll find that the EOS Digital Rebel is powerful, yet fun and easy to use. It features a 6.3-megapixel sensor, automatic and manual controls, and compatibility with Canon's range of EF lenses. This model does not include a lens.

Optics and Resolution
A large-format, high-resolution CMOS sensor captures 6.3 million pixels to deliver up to 3027 x 2048 pixel images. Other resolution modes include 2048 x 1360 and 1536 x 1024. As it captures images, the sensor amplifies each pixel's electric charge, for ultra-fast image scanning. The large sensor also has a 3:2 aspect ratio, traditional to 35mm film, for a familiar compositional feel.

Canon's exclusive DIGIC image processor offers advanced signal processing algorithms that heighten precision and detail, smooth gradation in highlight areas, and create color reproduction that is as vivid as it is utterly natural. Additionally, the DIGIC's speedier processing improves the camera's battery performance, and adds to the camera's overall responsiveness and agility.

More Features
With the 1.8-inch LCD screen, you can zoom images from 1.5x all the way to 10x, moving up, down, left and right to see any area up close. You can even advance to the next shot in the enlarged view with no need to zoom again. The Digital Rebel also generates JPEG Small/Normal image files to make the image playback faster on the camera's LCD monitor.

Advanced controls will keep experienced photographers motivated and inspire beginners to flex their SLR skills. Creative Zone modes include A-DEP (automatic depth of field auto exposure) to set a "zone of sharpness," Manual, Aperture Priority AE to set the aperture, Shutter Priority AE to set shutter speed, and Program AE to let the camera select different shutter/aperture combinations while maintaining a constant exposure.

The camera's controls are intelligently arranged. A mode dial gives you easy access to shooting controls to make even one-handed shooting comfortable.

Other features include:

  • Built-in, pop-up flash with an approximate 3-second recycle time
  • Continuous shooting speed of approximately 2.5 frames per second with a maximum burst mode of 4 shots
  • ISO speed range of 100 to 1600
  • 7-point autofocus with the following modes: One-Shot AF, Predictive AI Servo AF, AI Focus AF (Automatically selects One-Shot AF or AI Servo AF selected according to shooting mode), Manual Focusing (MF)
Printing
Canon has introduced a series of printers designed to work directly with its lineup of digital cameras, including the Digital Rebel. Using these printers, no computer is required--simply connect the camera to the printer and start printing. Printers include Canon's bubble jet direct printers i900D and i960, and card photo printer CP-200 and CP-300. New PictBridge compatibility allows you to connect the camera to any PictBridge-conforming printer and access a wide range of printing media, modes, and styles.

Storage and Transfer
Images are stored on CompactFlash Type I or II memory card; the Digital Rebel is MicroDrive compatible. The Digital Rebel does not include a memory card.

Images can be downloaded to either a Mac or PC via USB 1.1, which means the camera can be connected to any USB-based Windows Me/2000/XP and Mac OS 8.6 or later computer without installing any software.

Power and Size
The camera is powered by a rechargeable lithium-ion battery (BP-511, included). It measures 5.6 by 3.9 by 2.9 inches and weighs 19.7 ounces (excluding battery).

What's In The Box
This package includes the EOS Digital Rebel digital camera, rechargeable lithium-ion battery pack (BP-511) and battery charger (CB-5L), USB and AV cables, and wide neck strap. It also comes with Adobe Photoshop Elements and Digital Camera Solutions CD-ROMs with imaging software and USB drivers for Windows and Mac. ... Read more

Features

  • Dazzling resolution: the 6.3 megapixel CMOS sensor
  • The speed to capture the shots that won't wait
  • Perfect white balance for clear, true color
  • Reproducing and sharing your images is as exciting as creating them

Reviews (122)

5-0 out of 5 stars Awesome Camera!
I was initially attracted to the Canon because of the 6.3MP, and I am extremely impressed at the improvement in print resolution over my former 3.3MP digital. But what really thrilled me was the ease of use. I pulled the camera out of the box, and after charging the battery, I shot pictures for a couple of weeks before I could find the time to read the manual. To my delight, I found that the manual had nothing to teach me about using the camera that I hadn't already learned by using the menu displayed on the LCD screen. I found the buttons to be very intuitive, especially since I have owned several digital cameras.
The first accessory I purchased was a 512 mb ultra-fast CF card, so that the camera would not be hindered by a slow transfer to media. This has paid off well, as I do alot of sports photography in burst mode. The camera does an amazing job of capturing fast action with crystal clear continuous focusing. (I should mention that the lens I am using is a 28-200mm)
Battery life is great, and if you keep your LCD review time to a minimum, you should get hundreds of pictures on one charge. The flash also seems to be very strong, I have not been disappointed yet, but an accessory flash can be added if necessary.
The camera is definitely weightier than any digital I have owned, but I was not looking for something to slip into my pocket. What I really wanted was professional looking prints, and I have found them. The print quality so far is better than any SLR I have ever owned. I couldn't be more pleased!

5-0 out of 5 stars Pretty darn good camera
Previous digital camera is a Olympus Camedia 4.1 - it takes some very good pix and is quite rugged.

Before purchasing the Canon Rebel-D I read over a dozen editorial reviews, many dozen(s) customer reviews and hundreds of newsgroup postings related to it. I read the manual, cover to cover, three times and reviewed specific pages many times. I visited three different retail outlets and handled the camera many times.

I've now shot a few hundred test pix of a myriad of subjects using every camera setting available. Most were shot using the Canon EF 28-135 f/3.5-5.6 IS USM lens.

A lot of the 'con' comments about the camera - white balance problems, dark flash problems, focus issues, etc - I have found to be user user specific. Don't blame the camera.

I've printed differing sizes of prints on two different HP photo printers and have taken the files to four different retail print sources. With one exception the printed photos have been quite acceptable. (Kit's Camera at our local mall had a focus problem with their Dye-Sub printer. They assured me the tech would be called)

If I could add just two missing features they would be the LCD preview and the flash exposure adjustment.

The camera gets a thumbs-up here!

4-0 out of 5 stars Great Camera....High End Fun.
I purchased this camera about 6 months ago, it's a great camera and I haven't had 1 problem with it. I bought a few accessories..EX420 Flash, Canon 75-300 lens (there least expensive one, USM & IS wasn't an issue me)
lt's fast in auto focus. Purchased the battery grip also. Camera looks good, the grip helps with vert. shots and you have a slot for a second battery. Bought after market battery for $9.99 instead of $49.99 for OEM (look @ EBAY for batteries). If you purchase this camera you'll be very satisfied!

5-0 out of 5 stars C'mon, join the revolution... it'll feel real good!
I have been intrigued by this camera since its release. My old camera is a Canon PowerShot S30 (3.2MP). I wanted to buy an SLR to advance my photography skills and capabilities. When this beauty came along bearing a price tag under $1,000 and received prestigious acclaim I knew I wanted one. But I decided to delay for a few months, waiting to see what competition would arise, and how quickly the price would drop. That competition presented itself as the Nikon D70. Ultimately, I decided to get the D-Rebel because the price-to-quality ratio is exceptional; the ~$300+ more for the Nikon doesn't seem justifiable for what I think are negligible factors. Besides, my PowerShot has served me well and I'm used to the Canon system.

I've played with mine in the field for two days. Last weekend was my introduction day and I made a lot of mistakes -- camera shake, off-focus, underexposure. Today I went back to the same spots [in similar weather] and received much better results by using my tripod, setting the exposure compensation to +1/3 (most of the time) and sometimes forcing a longer shutter than 'auto' suggested. My photos went from dull to incredible with a few easy adjustments. If your photos come out poorly always exhaust the manual solutions before blaming faulty camera construction.

If you're moving up from a [Canon] SLR, many of the characteristics of the D-Rebel will be familiar. If, on the other hand, you're used to a P&S like myself some things will be awkward. For example, using the viewfinder instead of the LCD monitor to compose shots; using the Main Dial and LCD panel to implement settings; and manual focusing. My PowerShot allows manual tweaking, but it is usually easier to let the processor handle certain functions. The SLR is different -- it invites you to play.

I have read complaints about the camera's construction. Indeed, it is an all-plastic body, whereas the D-Rebel's big brother, the 10D, is magnesium alloy. But I think this will be an insignificant point for most people; the plastic body is sturdy enough to handle a day's work. It has a nice firm rubber grip on the right side. A friend has an EOS Elan 7 (n or ne) and the weight is approximately the same.

I also know some people don't like the fact that the D-Rebel uses the flash as an AF-assist lamp -- particularly because once the flash pops it will take a flash exposure. But the solution is simple enough: push the flash back down. The camera automatically re-evaluates the shutter speed, maintains focus and takes the shot. You will need to have it on a tripod for the shot to be successful, though.

After a lot of reading and searching for components to make up a great system, I ended up buying: Rebel with 18-55mm lens; EF 55-200mm II USM lens; 1 Gb Sandisk Ultra II CompactFlash; 420EX Speedlite flash; Sto-fen Omni-Bounce diffuser (for 420EX); Tiffen 58mm Deluxe Enhancing Filter Kit; Samsonite Worldproof 3.2 Download SLR bag; Tamrac Small Lens Case. (I wrote a review for the Samsonite bag. I think it's fantastic for carrying all my gear. I use the Tamrac bag when I want to travel light.)

Here's a stupid mistake I made that I'd like to enlighten others to, so that they may avoid doing the same. When I first tested the camera most of my shots were indoors and required the flash. In many of those shots I noticed a black blob. I thought maybe my flash was defective. The manual says there are certain conditions where the flash may be obstructed. My solution was simple enough: two of my fingers were in the way. With my PowerShot, I had become used to lifting my ring and pinky fingers away from the flash and lens so they would be out of the way... now doing it put them in the way of the flash. Sometimes the simplest answer is the right one.

Here are two things I feel quite fortunate to have learned (i.e., stumbled upon), as I did not read this in any review.
(1) When using a [Canon] digital SLR you need a "Type II" lens. Lenses have always induced aberrations of light, which would create 'ghosts' and other weird things. But 35mm film is produced with a coating that prevents them. When you use a D-SLR, however, that coating is not on your sensor, so those light artifacts appear again. So Canon created the "Type II" lens, where the aforementioned coating is on the glass. The only problem is that there are only a handful of these lenses at this point. Unfortunately, this dramatically weakens Canon's claim that you can use "over 50 lenses" on your D-Rebel. While technically true, you probably wouldn't like the results. (Popular Photography magazine ran an article about this, which is on their site.)
(2) Don't fall for tricky CompactFlash advertising. I bought several Viking Components CF cards for my PowerShot. They always worked well and I almost bought a big one for my D-Rebel. Then I considered the Lexar "40x" because they have a good reputation. "40x" sounds good, eh? The Sandisk Ultra II works at 60x! At the Large-Fine setting, this will save you one-third second of write-time. That is big when you think about action photography. The Sandisk card can write 3 images when the Lexar can only do 2. The Vikings are worse; they can't even write one image/second!

I am exceptionally pleased with my purchase -- not with just the D-Rebel, but the whole system. It pays to do your research and decide what's right for you. Personally, I think I put together an excellent 'amateur SLR' package that will allow me to grow and explore for a long time. Hopefully you will feel the same with a D-Rebel over your shoulder.

5-0 out of 5 stars Absolutely Amazing!
I've owned 3 previous digital camera's, all of them EVF "Electronic View Finder" models. My previous camera, a Nikon 5000 took admirable pictures, but nothing and I mean nothing compared to what this little baby puts out!

The autofocus is superb, the 4 frame image buffer really comes in handy when taking those quick action shots, plus you just can't beat the feel of a SLR.

Printing from an old HP 952C an 8x10 shot comes out looking exactly like a studio portrait. You already know all the reasons to pic this up, sub $1000 price range, compatible with all of your EF lenses, the sheer joy of taking great photos. Pick this little baby up, you will not be disappointed with this camera. ... Read more


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