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$118.74 $115.00 list()
1. Apple Airport Express with Air
$108.95
2. Apple M7600LL/E 802.11b AirPort
Too low to display $79.87 list($109.99)
3. Apple M8881LL/A AirPort Extreme
$240.99 $199.88 list()
4. Apple M8799LL/A AirPort Extreme
$42.99 $36.50 list($49.99)
5. Apple Airport Express Stereo Connection
$249.88
6. Airport Extreme Base Station w/
7. Apple AirPort Card Adapter Kit
list($299.99)
8. Apple M8209LL/A AirPort Base Station
9. Apple M8930LL/A AirPort Extreme
list($99.00)
10. Apple Computer M7600LL/D AirPort

1. Apple Airport Express with Air Tunes (M9470LL/A)

our price: $118.74
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0002GDIII
Catlog: CE
Manufacturer: Apple Computer
Sales Rank: 72
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Product Description

802.11g Wi-Fi base station (also compatible with 802.11b) * when connected to compatible modem or network, provides wireless Internet access to up to 10 computers at a time * minijack output (analog and mini-optical digital) for connection to a stereo system or powered speakers (cables available separately) * USB port for connection to a USB-compatible printer * 10/100 Base-T Ethernet port for connection to a compatible modem or network * weight: 6.7 oz. * dimensions: 1-3/16"W x 3-3/4"H x 3"D * warranty: 1 year ... Read more

Features

  • Enjoy your iTunes music library in virtually any room of your house
  • Share a single broadband Internet connection and USB printer without inconvenient and obtrusive cables
  • Create an instant wireless network on the go
  • Access an AirPort Express wireless network
  • Compatible with Windows XP or 2000; Mac OS X v10.2.7 or later

2. Apple M7600LL/E 802.11b AirPort Card

(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0000899ZD
Catlog: CE
Manufacturer: Apple Computer
Sales Rank: 710
Average Customer Review: 4.11 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Features

  • Compatible with the 802.11b wireless standard
  • Ranges up to 150 feet indoors at 11 Mbps
  • Provides tight security
  • Use with an Apple AirPort Extreme Base Station for added functionality
  • Compatible with AirPort-enabled Apple computers

Reviews (9)

5-0 out of 5 stars life changing
The wireless revolution has seriously altered the way I work. It didn't seem like it was that big of a deal, to be able to work anywhere in the house on a laptop. And then I was home over Thanksgiving and tried my father's - it was incredible. So, soon after I had my own and I love it - I even ended up getting another one for my wife's laptop.

Whether it's browsing amazon.com late at night in bed, checking morning email in the kitchen while the kids run around, or being able to set up a writing desk anywhere in the house without worrying about an accessible internet port - the airport system is awesome. Even if you only have a desktop computer it's worth it - you can to put the computer in a place where there's no internet plug, without the 40 foot cord draping your wall to connect it. All in all, a wireless system may seem extravagant, but once you have one you'll wonder how you got by without it.

The airport card, along with the base station, allows you to connect several computers, even ones that don't have wireless cards in them (i.e., we have two laptops on the wireless system, and then one iMac that doesn't have an airport card is plugged directly into the base station). You can print, scan - anything - wirelessly, as long as those extra components are connected to the base station.

If you have a big house and the base station won't be centrally located, you may want to look into the antenna. I have a 2500 square foot house and the base station is at one end of it. I can get access from anywhere in the house without the extra antenna, though in one or two places it's a weak signal. My father's house, on the other hand, is over 5000 square feet and the base station is at a far end - you can't even get a signal on the other side of the house. However, he purchased the antenna and the signal is now very strong wherever you are. A warning - you should make sure your airport network is password protected, especially if you get the antenna. The signal will be broadcast through half your neighborhood and if not protected, people can get on and use your airtime, clogging up your bandwidth.

Make sure you get the right card! There's the airport extreme card and the regular airport card (I believe they are both compatible with either base station). Check Apple's website for direct compatibility between your computer and the two different cards. They are different sizes and will only fit in the right kind of slot.

One final word - I've heard from others that certain products from Net Gear or other wireless manufacturers accomplish the same thing as the airport card and base station for much cheaper. I can't attest to the validity of this, but it might be worth looking into. I'd exercise extreme caution, since if you go with Apple products it will be covered with tech support, even if it's more expensive. And putting third party hardware in your computer will likely void the warranty on your computer.

5-0 out of 5 stars Watch out, this does not fit an Apple iBook G4!
Recommend and rating, hard to say. My intent is to make sure that people don't make the same stupid mistake that I did! An Apple iBook G4 can only accept an "airport extreme" card. I suspect that most of the latest generation ibooks, powerbooks, and powerpcs and etc can only take the extreme card.

Do your homework beforing buying the M7600LL card.

5-0 out of 5 stars Adapter Comments
Just to clear things up a bit further on the adapter business. When Apple started selling Airport-capable systems and cards, the cards could be used with the CRT iMac or an iBook or Powerbook. Rather than build a special slot in the iMac that you could slide the card into, the card came with a little wraparound bit that had a socket on it which plugged into the iMac. If you were going to use the card in an iBook or Powerbook, you didn't need the adaptor, the card slides into a slot. I guess after awhile they decided to including the adapter was a bit wasteful if a large segment of the buyers weren't going to use it, so they made it an optional extra. The fact that their newer systems didn't need the adapter, and that sales of the CRT iMac were slowing down probably had something to do with it as well.

I've bought 3 Airport cards myself for various systems, and have been very impressed with the ease of use and reliability of the product.

5-0 out of 5 stars it works like a dream
I am a recent convert and just got a new 12-inch powerbook. The retailer who sold it to me was supposed to have installed the airport card themselves, but they did not. The airport card came separately and I decided to install it myself. Not only was it the easiest thing to install in the world, it began working immediately. I'm impressed with how non-technical you need to be and how smoothly you can just do all these things that I would never have dreamt of doing myself in the PC world.

1-0 out of 5 stars If only it worked
Switched to Mac? Switch back.

I built an 802.11b network for the PCs in my house. I set up everything and had it working and tested for a few weeks before tackling the Airport install. Since I'm not usually a Mac user, I thought I'd make sure everything else was working first.

Well, it was the right decision. 8 months later, my Airport card still does not work. I put it in our iBook, and it's recognized, but there is an error message that locks up all the wireless applications and configuration, so the Airport is useless. Yes, I have the right OS version, and I've gotten the latest drivers and applications, but nothing works.

I'll try again, sometime, but it's just really hard to get psyched up for hours and hours of beating your head against the wall, trying to get something to work.

Hey, it might work out of the box for you. If you have an older iBook, though, I'd prepare for a struggle. ... Read more


3. Apple M8881LL/A AirPort Extreme Card
list price: $109.99
our price: Too low to display
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0000899ZB
Catlog: CE
Manufacturer: Apple Computer
Sales Rank: 815
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Features

  • Exchange files or play multiplayer games at data transfer rates of up to 54 Mbps
  • Compatible with the industry-standard 802.11b wireless networking protocol
  • Range of up to 50 feet at 54 Mbps and up to 150 feet at 11 Mbps
  • Join any of the thousands of Wi-Fi certified 802.11b wireless "hot spots" that are currently running in coffeehouses, bookstores, and airports
  • 128-bit WEP encryption for secure connections

4. Apple M8799LL/A AirPort Extreme Base Station with Modem and Antenna Port

our price: $240.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0000899ZA
Catlog: CE
Manufacturer: Apple Computer
Sales Rank: 1947
Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com Product Description

The AirPort Extreme Base Station with Modem and Antenna Port is compatible with the industry-standard 802.11b wireless networking protocol, which means all AirPort products, as well as Wi-Fi certified 802.11b wireless products. For higher performance you will need to have both the Airport Extreme Card and the AirPort Extreme Base Station. The range of AirPort Extreme is up to 50 feet at 54 Mbps and up to 150 feet at 11 Mbps. The Base Station can be used in conjunction with an Ethernet connection (such as with a cable modem, DSL modem, or Ethernet network) through the integrated Ethernet port, or with a telephone line through a modem.

The AirPort Extreme Base Station with Modem and Antenna Port also supports USB or Ethernet wireless printer sharing. Just plug in a compatible USB or Ethernet printer and with Mac OS X on your computer you can quickly and easily print. You can use the new USB port to attach a USB printer or use the 10/100BASE-T Ethernet LAN port to plug in an Ethernet printer directly into the base station.

With the new AirPort Extreme Base Station with Modem and Antenna Port, up to 50 users can work and play on the Internet simultaneously up to 150 feet away from an Ethernet connection or a phone line. The Base Station comes equipped with a built-in firewall to protect sensitive data on your computer and the ability to secure transmissions with support for 128-bit encryption.

The AirPort Extreme Base Station with Modem and Antenna Port lets you manage the range of your wireless network. An external antenna port is provided for you to attach an external antenna. There are two types of antennas available: an omni-directional and a directional, which extend the range of the AirPort Extreme base station. There is also a software feature that allows you on reduce the size of your wireless network, down to just a single room for extra privacy. ... Read more

Features

  • Exchange files or play multiplayer games at data transfer rates of up to 54 Mbps
  • Compatible with the industry-standard 802.11b wireless networking protocol
  • Range of up to 50 feet at 54 Mbps and up to 150 feet at 11 Mbps
  • Supports USB or Ethernet wireless printer sharing
  • Includes built-in v.90 modem with an RJ-11 port and an external antenna port

Reviews (5)

5-0 out of 5 stars Worth it
The wireless revolution has seriously altered the way I work. It didn't seem like it was that big of a deal, to be able to work anywhere in the house on a laptop. And then I was home over Thanksgiving and tried my father's - it was incredible. So, soon after I had my own and I love it - I even ended up getting another one for my wife's laptop.

Whether it's browsing amazon.com late at night in bed, checking morning email in the kitchen while the kids run around, or being able to set up a writing desk anywhere in the house without worrying about an accessible internet port - the airport system is awesome. Even if you only have a desktop computer it's worth it - you can to put the computer in a place where there's no internet plug, without the 40 foot cord draping your wall to connect it. All in all, a wireless system may seem extravagant, but once you have one you'll wonder how you got by without it.

The airport card, along with the base station, allows you to connect several computers, even ones that don't have wireless cards in them (i.e., we have two laptops on the wireless system, and then one iMac that doesn't have an airport card is plugged directly into the base station). You can print, scan - anything - wirelessly, as long as those extra components are connected to the base station.

If you have a big house and the base station won't be centrally located, you may want to look into the antenna. I have a 2500 square foot house and the base station is at one end of it. I can get access from anywhere in the house without the extra antenna, though in one or two places it's a weak signal. My father's house, on the other hand, is over 5000 square feet and the base station is at a far end - you can't even get a signal on the other side of the house. However, he purchased the antenna and the signal is now very strong wherever you are. A warning - you should make sure your airport network is password protected, especially if you get the antenna. The signal will be broadcast through half your neighborhood and if not protected, people can get on and use your airtime, clogging up your bandwidth.

Make sure you get the right card! There's the airport extreme card and the regular airport card (I believe they are both compatible with either base station). Check Apple's website for direct compatibility between your computer and the two different cards. They are different sizes and will only fit in the right kind of slot.

One final word - I've heard from others that certain products from Net Gear or other wireless manufacturers accomplish the same thing as the airport card and base station for much cheaper. I can't attest to the validity of this, but it might be worth looking into. I'd exercise extreme caution, since if you go with Apple products it will be covered with tech support, even if it's more expensive. And putting third party hardware in your computer will likely void the warranty on your computer.

4-0 out of 5 stars The best designed WiFi.
The best design for your desk top. High quality of this drives me crazy. However, it is a little bit expensive. Anyway, I love this high tech toy.

5-0 out of 5 stars Just don't buy a Dr. Bott antenna
The new base station is great. But don't be taken in by the advertising for the external antennas sold by Dr. Bott. They do nothing to extend the range of the airport and in most cases decrease signal strength. Check out the discussions on the Apple web site for more info on the external antennas.
Other than the external antenna port being a waste of time because there are no good antennas for it, the new ABS is a nice access point. And best of all, the new Windows utility for configuration is quite handy. Thankfully Apple has finally realized that the Airports aren't just "Macintosh" peripherals but are also used by many Windows users.

5-0 out of 5 stars Eat our wireless dust PCs
Apple is revolutionary. With the release of the Airport, wires were suddenly a thing from the past. No more fumbling with extension cords to reach your laptop from your desktop. Nope. Now, PCs have a wireless internet source, which makes them feel special. Well Apple has now increased it's original substantially. That's right. We Apple folks are a step ahead of the crowd. With speed like this, do we even need fast connections? You could have a 64kbps internet connection, and it would be easy to live with now. Now that it can go a longer distance, I can sit in the woods behind my house and write a novel. Great, revolutionary, spectacular. These are some of the words I can use to describe this. Buy it now!

5-0 out of 5 stars Increased bandwidth worth every penny!
I got this base station with my new 17" powerbook and I can say for certain it is well worth the money. I also have the original Airport base station that I bought when my son was born (so I can compare).

Now, the near five-fold increase in bandwidth will not effect Web surfing (unless you REALLY have a nice internet connection). But it very dramatically will increase the speed of transferring files between computers. When I got the new powerbook I moved all the data from my old laptop to the new. I hooked the old one up by ethernet and just kept the new wireless. Files were transferred at a great clip-- WAY faster than if I kept them both using the old base station. And this increase was in the mixed bandwidth mode (compatible with computers that can only use 802.11b).

As opposed to another review for the other Airport Extreme model, I see no decreased range at all-- but no real increase either. Adding the optional Antenna would presumably make it even more than the old base stations, but I have not done this. However, the speed is so much better that even bad reception does not adversely affect websurfing or file downloads. I have had mixed experience with other Wi-Fi systems (LinkSys, for instance).

As an important addition, the USB port to attach a printer or scanner is great. That way you need not buy a print server to share a printer and have the computers all be wireless at the same time. ... Read more


5. Apple Airport Express Stereo Connection Kit w/Monster Cables
list price: $49.99
our price: $42.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0002GDQZI
Catlog: CE
Manufacturer: Apple
Sales Rank: 1028
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Features

  • A Monster mini-to-RCA left/right audio cable
  • A Monster mini-to-optical digital Toslink audio cable
  • An AirPort Express power extension cord

6. Airport Extreme Base Station w/ Power Over Ethernet & UL 2043

(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0002FGEYY
Catlog: CE
Manufacturer: Apple
Sales Rank: 43971
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Features

  • With other computers (PC or Mac) equipped with 802.11b or 802.11g cards, you can easily share files and high-speed Internet access
  • Supports 802.11g wireless protocol for data transfer speeds of up to 54Mbps
  • Backwards compatible with 802.11b for data transfer speeds of up to 11Mbps
  • USB Port for printer connection - clients can wirelessly share a printer!
  • Supports up to 50 users simultaneously

7. Apple AirPort Card Adapter Kit

Asin: B00006I51H
Catlog: CE
Manufacturer: Apple
Sales Rank: 21659
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

8. Apple M8209LL/A AirPort Base Station
list price: $299.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00006662F
Catlog: CE
Manufacturer: Apple Computer
Sales Rank: 16184
Average Customer Review: 4.38 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Features

  • Up to 11 Mbps (data rate depends on environment)
  • 150-foot radius from the base station in typical use (range depends on building construction)
  • 2.4 GHz spread spectrum radio output power
  • Place it on your desktop or mount it on a wall (mounting brackets included)
  • Industry-standard IEEE 802.11b

Reviews (16)

5-0 out of 5 stars Apple Wi-Fi Made Simple - The Airport Rocks!
The Apple Airport Base Station is simply the easiest to deploy and trouble free 802.11b wireless access point networking solution available today.

As with all Apple products I have recently purchased, in less than 10 minutes out of the box, this product was fully setup and operational and supporting multiple iBooks and iMacs with full signal strength wireless networking made even more impressive with a broadband internet connection.

But what is really cool is that even if you do not have a fast internet connection, you can still share a dial up internet connection over the Airport network. How many other routers on the market today have this RJ-11 feature?

I uplinked the Airport to a Linksys 4-port router and turned off the NAT and DHCP capabilities of the Airport - just to let the Linksys continue serving NAT & DHCP - using the Airport as a bridge (and a wireless access point), instead of a router. Yet, the Airport can serve as your primary router if you have no additional hardware - I did not want to turn my Linksys into an expensive switch!

A hub or switch can be connected to the uplink ethernet jack if more wired LAN capability is needed. This product is a breeze to setup in either OS 9.x or OS 10.1 (and will be even easier in OS X 10.2). Make sure you use the latest Airport software for your OS (currently version 2.0.4 for OS X 10.1.5 and OS 9.2.2).

The Airport Setup Assistant and the Airport Admin Utility (in the Applications -> Utilities directory in OS X) are you friends - just plug the Airport into your LAN or modem, run the Assistant, and the next thing you know, you will be enjoying the freedom that only Wi-Fi can provide. No more wires!

If you are an Apple user who is looking for a Wi-Fi solution, look no further. You want the Airport Base Station - a purchace you will not regret!

5-0 out of 5 stars Definitely the best for Macs - but get the latest software
While the Airport mightn't have all the bells and whistles of some of the competition, it is the absolutely the best solution for Mac users. I use it at home to support a mixture of Macs and PCs, and found it a breeze to set up and use.

It's also really easy to upgrade, unlike some other wireless routers I've used. Apple keep adding new functionality that you can download for free...(e.g., 128-bit encryption, PPP dial-in, and PPTP support).

N.B. - If you use a Windows PC to access your office network over a VPN, then you will need to check the Apple website to get the latest version of the Airport software (version 2.0.4). Earlier software versions don't support Microsoft's PPTP tunnelling protocol, but the latest version works just fine (you also need to be running MacOS X 10.1.5).

Upgrading is a breeze, after you install the update on your Mac, you just have to hit the "update" button in the Airport confugration tool! No messing around with setting up tftp or serial connections.

5-0 out of 5 stars Fantastic product but now outdate by the Airport Extreme
Check out B0000899ZA and B0000899ZC, the new Airport Extreme. Much faster and lower prices.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Product
One of the best features of the AirPort is its built - in modem and Network Address Translation (NAT) which allows multiple wireless computers to share a single dial in connection. If you're not up with cable or DSL yet, you can still get a wireless home or small business network going in no time, even if you're not a techie. When connected to cable or DSL, this little guy really shines, fully connects both Apples and PCs and is the coolest looking networking device you'll find. Apple just announced a new version with print server, but the current model AirPort has botth WAN and LAN connectors, so you if you're all wireless now, you can set up a 10BT print server as a peripheral and print off the WAN port. More expensive than some other solutions, but it does more too.

4-0 out of 5 stars Wait for new version
Think carefully before you buy this BaseStation. At the MacWorld expo Keynote on January 9th, Steve Jobs announced a new version of the Airport Base Station which supports 802.11g--boosting the speed from 11Mbps to 54Mbps. The new version also acts as a print server, and the units automatically bridge between each other. ... Read more


9. Apple M8930LL/A AirPort Extreme Base Station

Asin: B0000899ZC
Catlog: CE
Manufacturer: Apple Computer
Sales Rank: 12806
Average Customer Review: 4.24 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Features

  • Exchange files or play multiplayer games at data transfer rates of up to 54 Mbps
  • Compatible with the industry-standard 802.11b wireless networking protocol
  • Range of up to 50 feet at 54 Mbps and up to 150 feet at 11 Mbps
  • Supports USB or Ethernet wireless printer sharing
  • 128-bit WEP encryption for secure connections

Reviews (17)

5-0 out of 5 stars Now fully complaint with 802.11g final spec
Merely a week after the 802.11g specification is finalized, Apple released a free firmware upgrade that brings Airport Extreme Base Station (AEBS) up to compliance (downloadable from Apple's web site). In addition to fully complying with 802.11g and 802.11b standards, the upgrade also improves performance with both wired (10/100BASE-T Ethernet) and wireless (802.11b and 802.11g) clients.

If you are using Mac OS X 10.2 or higher, you can upgrade the AirPort Admin Utility to gain additional benefits:
- New automatic channel selection option. If set, AEBS will automatically select the optimal WiFi channel when it restarts.
- New 'Enable interference robustness' option under 'More...' dialog box. If enabled, AEBS will better interoperate with wireless telephones, microwave ovens, etc.
- Wireless Distributed System (WDS) is now easier to setup.
- Control over DHCP range.

Yes, AEBS is better than ever. While AEBS remains among the most expensive 802.11g WiFi routers on the market, it sets itself apart with compelling strengths:
- It is the easiest to setup under Mac OS X by far, thanks to elegant AirPort Admin Utility.
- USB printer port for sharing printers and printing wirelessly!
- Excellent cosmetics... it's soooooo pretty!
- WDS lets you expand WiFi range with additional AEBS or other WDS-compliant WiFi access points (most WiFi routers lack WDS).
- Timely firmware updates from Apple. Bring on the 802.11i WLAN security!

5-0 out of 5 stars Share broadband between Mac & PC
It hurt to pay so much, but I had the feeling that getting the Airport Extreme Base Station would save me time and headaches when trying to share broadband between a PC and Mac.

I was successful with this platform/OS/equipment combination:
Apple M8930LL/A Airport Extreme Base Station
Mac: OS 10.1.5, Apple Airport Card
PC: Win2000 Pro, NetGear MA101 Wireless USB Adapter

Plugged an ISP-provided DSL modem into the Base Station and configured the Base Station using the Mac. (Had no success with Apple's Airport Admin config software for the PC.)

Then plugged in the NetGear MA101 on the PC, installed the software from CD, and configured the settings to match the Mac security.

I got strong signal strength and throughput from both the NetGear MA101 and the Airport Card in a three story house.
40-bit WEP works fine. 128-bit is occasionally a little buggy on the PC, requiring me to temporarily reset both platforms to 40-bit.

Haven't tried setting up file sharing yet, but will attempt the USB printer connection on the Base Station. (Caution, check Apple.com/airport for list if approved USB printers that will work with the Base Station. Also, this USB printer feature supposedly requires the Mac to run OS 10.2.3+)

I wish the Airport Base Station manual had more scenario details and suggestions how to tailor your WAN configuration. I spent a lot of time searching the Apple BBS regarding questions I think should have been covered in the manual.

Overall, the Airport Extreme Base Station is a thing of beauty to look at, relatively easy to configure -- but I'm scared to death of someone knocking it to the floor.

5-0 out of 5 stars Wireless Internet as a Fashion Statement
Apple makes cool stuff, no doubt about it. But one of their coolest products is the Airport Extreme system of wireless internet.

Using the Airport Extreme Base Station, in addition to an Airport Extreme reception card in your computer, you can move all around your home or office without the messy clutter of ethernet cables or connection equipment.

Setup is a snap using the included instructions. Within minutes you'll be surfing the web and accessing data wirelessly.

The only setback is the relative sensitivity of the Airport system. It doesn't like being near other computer components or going through walls. But, when push comes to shove, the unit does its job.

5-0 out of 5 stars Airport Rocks
Ease of use makes this the best choice for mac users.

1-0 out of 5 stars Overpriced and unreliable
Apple Airport Base Stations have a history of overheating and ruining the electronics inside. I lost a ABS "snow" unit this way. Fortunately, I found at least two online businesses devoted to repair of base stations, or else buying unrecoverable units at salvage prices.

Apple Airport Base Stations are often than twice the price of equivalent devices from other manufacturers. The features of the Apple product do not justify such a huge disparity in price. You're just paying for the brand name.

Also, think twice before investing in a 802.11g wireless router, because if you use it for Internet via broadband like DSL or cablemodem, you are limited by the bandwidth of the slowest part of the system. DSL/cable bandwidth is typically about one-fifth of the 802.11g bandwidth. So you aren't going to surf the net faster. A faster router helps multiple computers on your local network communicate with each other (for instance, if you host multiplayer computer game parties), but connecting to the outside world doesn't improve. Of course, if you don't have broadband and your router connects via modem, the bottleneck is even worse.

Given Apple's track record of poor quality, premium prices, and dubious benefit of the "extreme" model, I do not recommend buying this product. Get a Linksys or Netgear 802.11b router for $40 or so, and you'll be just as happy. That's what I did, and I'm sending my ABS 'snow' unit in for salvage. ... Read more


10. Apple Computer M7600LL/D AirPort Card
list price: $99.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00005RD8T
Catlog: CE
Manufacturer: Apple Computer
Sales Rank: 13814
Average Customer Review: 4.47 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Features

  • Access your home or business network with wireless technology
  • Reach speeds up to 11 Mbps
  • Easy plug and play PCMCIA installation
  • Roam up to 150 feet from your access point
  • Features 2.4 GHz frequency for better range and connection quality

Reviews (19)

5-0 out of 5 stars Apple Airport Card and Linksys WAP11
I bought an Apple Airport card for my Titanium Powerbook G4 and also a Linksys WAP11 Wireless Access Point. Initially, I had some trouble maintaining a consistant connection (the Powerbook would connect to the WAP11 but if I put it to sleep or restarted it, it would not find it again unless I rebooted the WAP11).

Well, after updating the firmware in the WAP11 and Airport card to their latest versions, I'm happy to say they work just great together!!! I love Apple stuff but $299 for their Airport Base Station is just a bit too pricey for me. So, I bought the WAP11 for around $150 and I'm a happy camper.

I haven't tested network printing and/or Appletalk. I think the WAP11 supports Appletalk but you will want to be sure of that if that is important to you. For browsing the web and any other TCP/IP related uses, it works just fine.

By the way, I'm using 128-bit encryption feature on both the Airport card and the WAP11. That involves entering in a "password phrase" in the WAP11 configuration software. The software then converts the phrase into a 128-bit hex number. It's a long number so you'll want to write it down.

When your Airport finds the WAP11, you'll want to the 128-bit key in the password field but make sure it is preceded by a "$" sign. After that, you should be able to connect.

One other thing to consider, you will need a PC with a USB port in order to update the WAP11 firmware. I tried updating the firmware using the Mac and Virtual PC but it would not recognize the WAP11. So, you might want to sneak into work at night or on the weekend to update the firmware...hehehe

Long live Apple!!!!!!!

Happy computing!!! :-)

5-0 out of 5 stars NOTHING BUT NET (well, wireless Net)
I'm not a Mac guy. I am responsible for the wireless network at my place of work. We run Cisco 350 Series AP in two seperate buildings with primarily Cisco wireless pc cards.

I buy several other brands of wireless cards for testing (compaq, xircom linksys) and picked up an AirPort card as well. I have to admit I was a little confused at first, but I think the problem was my lack of understanding when it comes to Apple terminology. Airport? Is that the base station or the client?

As soon as I figured it out, I poked around in OS X and saw the settings for the wireless card. I input the SSID and the WEP key and a few other settings, and it picked up the signal, associated, autheticated and was browsing perfectly.

The true test was when I took it home to my wireless network. It switched between the two seamlessly. Even at Starbucks (at least the locations that have wireless access) it worked great. They broadcast their SSID, I associcated with their access point, signed in and was off and running with chat and email while sipping a mouth full of esspresso roast. You can set up wireless profiles, so if you go between wireless network, you don't have to make any changes. They are already stored for you and ready to use when you arrive...very nice.

So a PC guys opinion of this wireless card??? Five stars.

And just as a side not for all you Mac fans out there, the Cisco LMC-352 wireless card will also fit into your iBook underneath the keyboard as well.

Hope this helps.

Kevin

5-0 out of 5 stars No More Wires!
When folks who have already dipped their feet into the waters of wireless breathlessly tell you, "You don't know what you're missing," BELIEVE THEM! The ability to use a computer without a wired network connection -- especially when working with portable computers -- is astonishing.

There are a considerable number of wireless networking options available. As a result, I did a lot of casual research before choosing Apple's Airport card for my Titanium Powerbook G4 (Tibook). My existing network consisted of one Linksys 4 port Etherfast Cable/DSL Router (model BEFSR71), one Toshiba cable modem, three wired desktop PCs (two running Windows 2000 & one running Windows XP) and the Tibook running OS X 10.1.2 that I desired to connect wirelessly.

Given the relatively high cost of the Airport Base Stations, I quickly began looking at the Linksys wireless access point (model: WAP11) as a potential solution. Owing to the 802.11b standard, an Apple Airport card can and does successfully work with a Linksys wireless access point -- using 128 bit WEP (Wireless Encryption Protocol) security, no less. There are some things to be aware of when configuring an Airport with a third-party wireless access point, but they're relatively minor and fairly well documented on Usenet discussion groups and sites accessible via search engines.

As a result, within a day of getting my Airport card I had it successfully installed and fully functional in my Tibook, and could check and respond to email from the comfort of my couch downstairs -- no more 50 foot Ethernet cable snaking through my house like a diver's umbilicle hose! The Airport's range is good, with still over 50% signal strength when I'm downstairs and on the opposite side of my home from the wireless access point. Limited usage outside a typical home may even be possible (such as it is for me), depending on the number of walls and other obstructions between the Airport card and WAP. Experiment with the placement of your WAP to find the optimal location.

The most annoying thing about the Apple Airport Card, at least for Tibook owners, is having to install it. Installing an Airport card (or hard drive, for that matter) in a Tibook requires removing 8 Philips screws from the bottom case and gingerly prying the ultra-thin titanium sheet off to expose the portable's innards. Once exposed, installing the Airport Card is very easy, right down to the integrated Airport antenna that's standard in all modern Apple portables. The benefits to the Airport Card residing *inside* the computer are 1. it's always with you when you need it, 2. it doesn't occupy a valuable "PC Card" slot and 3. you don't have to worry about breaking off the delicate external antenna of a PC Card-based wireless networking card.

After reassembling your Apple portable and restarting, the Airport should be alive, albeit without anyone to talk to. That's where properly configuring your wireless access point -- be it an Airport Base Station or third-party device, like my Linksys WAP11 -- comes into play. Do that correctly, and your Airport card will indicate it "sees" that wireless network is within range. Connect, enter the wireless network's password (if required), and you've joined the ranks of the No More Wires club!

Be sure to keep up-to-date on Apple's software updates, as they periodically release new firmware updates for the Airport Cards and Airport Base Stations.

Via wireless connection,
- A happy Airport/Tibook owner

1-0 out of 5 stars If only it worked
Switched to Mac? Switch back.

I built an 802.11b network for the PCs in my house. I set up everything and had it working and tested for a few weeks before tackling the Airport install. Since I'm not usually a Mac user, I thought I'd make sure everything else was working first.

Well, it was the right decision. 8 months later, my Airport card still does not work. I put it in our iBook, and it's recognized, but there is an error message that locks up all the wireless applications and configuration, so the Airport is useless. Yes, I have the right OS version, and I've gotten the latest drivers and applications, but nothing works.

I'll try again, sometime, but it's just really hard to get psyched up for hours and hours of beating your head against the wall, trying to get something to work.

Hey, it might work out of the box for you. If you have an older iBook, though, I'd prepare for a struggle.

5-0 out of 5 stars Wireless rocks!
Like everything Apple makes, it was trivial to install and setup. End of story.

The real glory is being able to carry my iBook all over the house and use it everywhere. Combine that with the great battery usage in the iBook, and I am finally not tied down!

Go Mac, and do it without wires. You won't regret it for a single moment. ... Read more


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